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  3. UK threat level raised to highest level 23 May 2017 From the section UK UK terror threat level raised to highest level of 'critical', meaning further attack may be imminent, prime minister says This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. If you want to receive Breaking News alerts via email, or on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App then details on how to do so are available on this help page. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article
  4. Manchester bomber named by police 23 May 2017 From the section UK Salman Abedi, 22, named by police as suspected suicide bomber who killed 22 people and injured 59 at Manchester Arena This breaking news story is being updated and more details will be published shortly. Please refresh the page for the fullest version. If you want to receive Breaking News alerts via email, or on a smartphone or tablet via the BBC News App then details on how to do so are available on this help page. You can also follow @BBCBreaking on Twitter to get the latest alerts. View the full article
  5. Manchester Arena blast: 22 dead and 59 hurt 23 May 2017 From the section Manchester Image copyright Peter Byrne Twenty-two people, including children, are now known to have been killed and 59 injured in a suspected terror attack at Manchester Arena. The blast happened at 22:35 BST on Monday at the end of a pop concert by the US singer Ariana Grande. Greater Manchester Police said the lone male attacker, who died in the blast, was carrying an improvised explosive device which he detonated. Relatives are using social media to hunt for missing loved ones. Police have set up an emergency telephone number in response to the attack. It is: 0161 856 9400. Home Secretary Amber Rudd said it was "a barbaric attack, deliberately targeting some of the most vulnerable". The prime minister is to chair a meeting of the government's emergency Cobra committee at around 09:00 BST. The explosion happened in the arena's foyer shortly after the concert ended, close to the entrance to Victoria train and tram station. The station has been closed and all trains cancelled. View the full article
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  7. Police respond to Manchester Arena blast reports 22 May 2017 From the section Manchester Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionWatch: Concert goers flee Manchester ArenaPolice are responding to a "serious incident" in Manchester amid reports of an "explosion" following a pop concert. Witnesses reported hearing a "huge bang" following an Ariana Grande gig at Manchester Arena. Network Rail said train lines out of Manchester Victoria station, which is close to the concert venue, were blocked. Greater Manchester Police tweeted to urge people to stay away from the area. View the full article
  8. My town had 18 officers on the beat 10 years ago. Now there are four. The service we provide is woefully inadequate - but not for the want of trying... https://www.theguardian.com/public-leaders-network/2017/may/20/police-cuts-fewer-officers-unrelenting-pressure
  9. Cressida Dick told children in London feel 'naked' if they are not armed with a weapon. Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick Children as young as six are carrying knives and ten-year-olds are arming themselves with weapons out of fear, the country's top police officer has been told. Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick heard children "feel naked" without them, while some are too scared to cross the capital's roads unarmed. Ms Dick vowed to get to the root of knife crime as she visited a youth centre in Putney, south-west London, meeting community leaders, reformed gang members and the family of Lewis Elwin - a 20-year-old trainee electrician stabbed to death in Tooting last year. The Commissioner promised more officers in schools and others in every ward to help build relationships with young people. She was told community groups are "screaming out" for a relationship with police, but the force is "not following up". One woman told Ms Dick knife crime affects children far younger than the teenagers and young men normally associated with it. She said: "On the housing estate, it's six-year-olds that are carrying knives, because they think they won't be stopped. You need to start there, in the primary schools - you need to tell much younger people." Josh Osbourne, a mentor at youth charity Carney's Community, said ten-year-olds live in fear, saying: "They can't even cross the road because they're at odds or in a dispute with somebody else from literally the same postcode but across the road." Andy Smith, from social enterprise The Feel Good Bakery, told Ms Dick young people carry blades for protection, saying: "They say they feel naked if they haven't got their knife with them." The capital has seen a wave of knife attacks in recent weeks, with more than a dozen people killed or seriously injured. Scotland Yard launched the latest phase of Operation Sceptre earlier this month, cracking down on knife crime. But despite more than 70 arrests for possession of offensive weapons and knives, within a week three more people had been fatally stabbed. Speaking to the Press Association after the meeting, Ms Dick said it was "pretty horrifying" to hear of armed six-year-olds. She said: "It's outrageous to hear a six-year-old is carrying a knife, for whatever reason. "That's something a police officer by themselves or even a police force isn't going to be able to have very much impact on. The question there is what are the parents doing? What are the school doing?" Ms Dick said youngsters often carry knives for "some kind of respect, some kind of kudos", but added: "I do accept there are places where some of our young people are scared and they feel it makes sense to carry a knife. "I can say as long as I live that it does not make them safer. They may not hear that message from me... we need to get people in communities, we need to get people in schools, we need to get parents understanding and helping young people to understand... it will end in tragedy, probably, for them." Outlining her plans for early intervention to tackle the epidemic, Ms Dick said: "I want to shift us further into prevention. I want all of us to be working on stopping this before it happens. "Community groups will be an incredibly important part of that. We need to play our part, but it is only a part." The Commissioner still has work to do to reach those communities - Mr Osbourne said the meeting was "about as much use as a chocolate teapot". He added: "We have realised that the things that we need, the Commissioner is unable to provide." View on Police Oracle
  10. What is the problem with answering the question truthfully?
  11. I was told it was mainly around 70 but sometimes it peaked up to 80 when lorries and buses were driving past. And I was told the same. The audio test they do is for without hearing aids. Apparently you would have to go elsewhere to do another test with hearing aids. I did speech recognition test with an audiologist which gave me an idea of how much I can hear with and without hearing aids. As for the radio, it think it's really up to me. The sargant I spoke to the other day said he pretty much never uses his radio piece unless he's in an extremely busy area like a football ground. He said he doesn't like the feeling of sometging being inside you hearing. But if I do wear the radio piece, I will just take one hearing aid out.
  12. General election 2017: May defends revised social care plans 22 May 2017 From the section Election 2017 Theresa May has defended making changes to the Tories' social care manifesto pledge as critics called it a "manifesto meltdown". The PM told the BBC "nothing has changed" and claimed rival parties had been "trying to scare" elderly people. Her announcement that an overall cap on costs would be included in the Tories' offer followed criticism of the policy, first announced on Thursday. She said the size of the cap would be the subject of a consultation. BBC Election Live: Rolling text and video updates Simon Jack: Biggest wealth tax ever? Reality check: Who could social care changes affect? Labour and the Lib Dems said the policy was "in meltdown". Since the publication of the Conservative manifesto last week, much of the attention has focused on reforms to the way care for elderly and vulnerable adults is funded. The manifesto did not mention an overall cap on costs, instead proposing a £100,000 "floor" beyond which people's assets would be protected. Speaking to activists in Wales earlier, the PM said the package would now include an "absolute limit" on the money people would have to pay, triggering accusations of a U-turn on the manifesto announcement. In her BBC interview, Mrs May denied this and said the principle the policy was based on "remains absolutely the same". The whole package will be put out to consultation, she said, adding that people were "worried" by the Labour Party saying they could have to sell their homes under the reforms. "What we have put in the manifesto is that we will have a consultation and the principles on which our social care policy will be based," she said. "That I think is the right thing to do." View the full article
  13. Any idea what decibels the background noise was at? Might just do my own check first. I asked my audiologist what level my hearing was at with aids and she said they didn't have a way of knowing, which seems odd to me. Do you know yet whether you will get an ear piece solution that will work with your aids, or just use the radio on loudspeaker? Again, really good news and well done!
  14. General election: Theresa May changes social care plans 22 May 2017 From the section Election 2017 Image copyright Science Photo Library Theresa May has said proposed changes to social care funding will include an option for an "absolute limit" on the money people will have to pay. The Conservatives ruled out a cap on total costs in last week's manifesto, instead saying no-one would see their assets fall below £100,000. The PM said the plan was "sensible" and would stop the system from collapse. But she said she wanted to address "shameful" fears that people would be forced to sell their family home. She told activists in Wales that the Conservatives were "determined the fix the system" and the consultation on the plans, if the party wins the election, would consider a cap among the options. BBC Election Live: Rolling text and video updates Simon Jack: Biggest intergenerational redistribution ever? Reality check: Who could social care changes affect? "We will make sure nobody has to sell their family home to pay for care," she said. "We will make sure there's an absolute limit on what people need to pay. And you will never have to go below £100,000 of your savings, so you will always have something to pass on to your family" Mrs May said she had not "changed the basic principles" set out in the manifesto, saying the plans would still give people "peace of mind" about the care available, but was now clarifying the details. But Former Chancellor George Osborne, now editor of the Evening Standard, said it was a U-turn. Currently, people living in residential care can ask their local authority to pay their bill and recover the money from the sale of their family home after they die. The Conservatives' plan would extend this right to those receiving care in their own homes, who would have to pay until they were down to their last £100,000. Image copyright ForMed Films Under the Conservative plans nobody with assets of less than £100,000 would have to pay for social care. Currently anyone with assets of over £23,250 is expected to pay the full cost of their residential care and the value of their home can be taken into account. But that is not the case if you receive care in your own home. Under the Tory plans the value of your home may in future be factored in, although the money would not be taken from your estate until after your death. This means some people fear they will not be able to pass their homes down to their children. Why many will pay more for care The BBC's assistant political editor Norman Smith said Conservative sources had earlier been dismissing the prospect of any rethink over the plans, insisting there would be "no rowing back". He said he had been told that while there would be a consultation, this had always been planned and it would only examine "the finer detail" of the policy. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had accused the Conservatives of "forcing those who need social care to pay for it with their homes," labelling the policy a "dementia tax". The Lib Dems, meanwhile, had said nine out of 10 homes would be eligible to be sold under the new regime, citing Land Registry house sale figures. Calling for a "national movement" against the policy, Lib Dem leader Tim Farron said it was a "callous blow for people who have dementia and other long-term conditions, like multiple sclerosis and motor neurone disease, and of course their families. "It is not just a massive mistake but a cruel attack on vulnerable people the length and breadth of this country." The Conservatives had attempted to fight back online, with a paid-for ad on Google which pop up when users of the search engine type in the words "dementia tax". The ad reads "The so-called 'dementia tax' - Get the real facts - conservatives.com, together with a link to an explainer about the party's social care policies on its website. View the full article
  15. Yea, they were testing the decibels in the background to make sure it was a realistically busy enviroment. Thank you very much.
  16. The bigger forces tend to retain a pass mark of around 60-65%, this is likely because they get a greater volume of applicants and they need to wittle numbers down easier. The smaller forces often maintain the standard 50% as they get fewer applicants but it is at the discretion of each force. My local force request a 60% pass mark and I was gutted as I got 57% but i technically haven't failed, they just request a higher mark. I am in the process of transferring my score to an alternative force who do accept 50%. The 50% grade is set by the College of Policing so it is no mean feat to achieve this or slightly above. Good luck. x
  17. If that's what it takes then i'll sit another A/C, it's just so hard not knowing either way. The email response I received from HR said that once they received all the results back from the A/C's they run then they can make a decision as to whether or not they have capacity to accept transferred scores. That to me suggests that I will know before September but it's impossible to know for sure.
  18. Hi, Is anyone currently going through the recruitment process for Gloucestershire Constabulary? I've passed my A/C but not hear any further than this. Just wondering if anyone else is in the same boat?
  19. If I'm perfectly honest I'm not sure how much checking is done, I know if you list them they can't get you for not putting them down
  20. You want to start making that professional impression now, suit and boot it mate. I went to one of these years ago and some people turned up in t shirts, jeans, shorts - one even came in flip flops. Even on the AC there was still one or two in jeans and t shirts and funnily enough, they didn't get through. Being a police officer is all about professionalism. Show it early doors even if it's an informal registration. You never know who's watching and taking note.
  21. That's brilliant news, congratulations Warren.
  22. General election 2017: New warning over social care plans 22 May 2017 From the section Election 2017 Image copyright Science Photo Library Tory plans to change how social care is funded in England could be derailed by councils, a former minister has warned. The party wants to include the value of someone's home when deciding how much they must pay towards care at home - but allow them to pay after they die. The Conservatives say the changes ensure fairness across the generations. But Sir Steve Webb, the ex-Lib Dem pensions minister, says there is already a "lottery" in the way councils use existing deferred payment schemes. Currently, people living in residential care can ask their local authority to pay their bill and recover the money from sale of their family home after they die. The Conservatives' plan would extend this right to those receiving care in their own homes, who would have to pay until they were down to their last £100,000. Reality check: Who could social care changes affect? Tory opposition to social care plans But Sir Steve, who is now policy director for pensions specialist Royal London, said Freedom of Information responses showed a wide variation in the number of deferred payment arrangements set up. Some councils in England had not signed any agreements to let people defer their payments, while in other areas more than 100 agreements had been signed. 'Shaky foundations' Sir Steve said: "It is clear that there is already a lottery as to whether people facing significant care costs can exercise their legal right to defer their payments under the existing system. "The government will need to investigate very quickly why the present system is not working properly, otherwise there is a danger of building a new system on very shaky foundations." The councils who had entered into the most agreements were Southampton City Council with 331, followed by Essex County Council with 208 and Middlesbrough Council with 165. In contrast, 10 authorities - Westminster, Tower Hamlets, Hackney, Kensington and Chelsea, Haringey, Lewisham, Lambeth, Ealing, Blackburn with Darwen, and Luton - said they had not issued any. How would the Tory social care plans work? Image copyright ForMed Films Under the Conservative plans nobody with assets of less than £100,000 would have to pay for social care. Currently anyone with assets of over £23,250 is expected to pay the full cost of their residential care and the value of their home can be taken into account. But that is not the case if you receive care in your own home. Under the Tory plans the value of your home may in future be factored in, although the money would not be taken from your estate until after your death. This means some people fear they will not be able to pass their homes down to their children. Why many will pay more for care Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green said the Tories would not "look again" at the proposed changes, and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said the "broad thrust" was right. Conservative former business minister Lord Willetts said the plan was "one of the bravest, most serious and most important" features of the Conservative manifesto. He told Westminster Hour on BBC Radio 4 the proposal meant social care for older people would be financed by pensioners with "substantial assets" instead of younger people "struggling to make ends meet". Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has accused the Conservatives of "forcing those who need social care to pay for it with their homes," labelling the policy a "dementia tax". Lord Wood, former advisor to Ed Miliband, said the problem with the Tory plan is that "it's not a long term system solution because it abandons the principle of social insurance". The Lib Dems, meanwhile, said nine out of 10 homes would be eligible to be sold under the new regime, citing Land Registry house sale figures. Calling for a "national movement" against the policy, Lib Dem leader Tim Farron said: "Every elderly person that needs care should receive it in the best place for them and not be fearful of those mounting, limitless costs." View the full article
  23. Hello all I have been given a start date for the 31st July which i am happy about. However i was wondering how long after starting am i allowed to take leave? My partner is currently pregnant and lives in a different country, because of this i was hoping to go there when she gives birth. If the initial training is only 12 weeks then i might make it in time if i am allowed time off. does anyone know anything that could help me out?
  24. Thanks for the reply. Hopefully ill be fine then.
  25. Yes, either way offences are deemed indictable. Just remember TWOC and basic harassment are summary only as it's often forgot. Also means you can't S32 search for these summary only offences either.
  26. Cool I'm still learning so just wanted to make sure I was on the right track. Thanks
  27. No I don't :-) ... intention is the only difference between a nd b ... if he is leaning over the counter with intent to still then is 9.1a... if he is leaning over the counter to see if maybe if is any staff around and seeing the burger, decide to steal it, then is 9.1b Sent from my SM-N910F using Tapatalk
  28. Tories 'won't look again' at social care plans 21 May 2017 From the section Election 2017 Damian Green has said the Tories will not rethink plans to fund social care in England, amid warnings they will go down badly with core Tory voters. The Work and Pensions Secretary said: "We have set out the policy, which we are not going to look at again." The Tory manifesto says elderly people requiring care in their own homes would have to meet the cost - but would be allowed to keep £100,000. But a Tory think tank says it could be the "biggest stealth tax in history". View the full article
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