Jaydee

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Jaydee last won the day on August 27 2016

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About Jaydee

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  • Birthday 10/10/86

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  1. Does reality of job change your outlook?

    Yes it does change the way you view a lot of things. You will be exposed to things you never knew even happened or only ever saw on television or read in books. You will see and deal with some absolutely abhorrent and horrendous things/people/situations, but you will also see some things that will give you laughs for many years to come. Sometimes it can be hard to maintain a positive outlook on society in general, I am past a year in now and even with my previous CSO experience I find myself thinking the worst of people because of my experiences as a PC. Your colleagues will always carry you through and when you do get a good result for a genuine member of the public it feels brilliant, you won't forget it! Your world view WILL change and you will become less trusting of people. You will also have some bloody good laughs and have a chance to do things that most others will never be able to do. The main thing I can suggest is remember that your family, friends and colleagues will make a huge difference and that can make or break you. I wish you the very best of luck and I am sure you will have a great time (most of the time!)
  2. GOWISELY is hammered in to us all when it comes to searching, particularly it seems to be mentioned when discussing S.1 PACE (which of course must be in a public place. S.23 MDA is fair game to us anytime and anywhere if the grounds exist, there is no specific mention of public or private places mentioned in the legislation. Of course S.19 PACE is one to be aware of as you must be lawfully on the premises in order to physically seize anything, I presume if you are in a position to search somebody then you are lawfully on the premises.
  3. You can only handcuff to prevent injury or escape. If you are going to throw the bracelets on anybody you should be prepared to justify it. Personally I don't always handcuff, on some occasions it has actually kept the situation calm. If I feel uncomfortable then it is for a reason, that reason is my justification for handcuffing.
  4. That sounds like a really unusual way of doing things. Which force are you with if you don't mind answering? My tutor period was 10 weeks (final week was actually back at the assessor unit and not operational and the first week I wasn't in because of bank holidays etc.) We where all allocated a dedicated tutor for this period, if for whatever reason your tutor is not available for a shift of a period of time you would work with another colleague. It is good to work with different officers to see how they work as every officer is different. I don't like the idea of constantly changing during the tutor phase though! I am sure you will do just fine in the end though, the first few weeks are pretty tough on anybody!
  5. I presume you mean you can't search the premises following arrest under S.32 for summary offences. A search of the offender following arrest is fine for any offence, only searching a premises under S.32 requires it to be indictable. But yeah if an offence is triable either way it is indictable.
  6. Shifts

    You will start on patrol. The shift pattern will almost certainly have changed by the time you go out after training. Recently we changed to the new functional model. Instead of running 5 blocks A to E, we now have 5 blocks which are split further in to sub-blocks. We now work a 25 week rolling shift pattern, quite frankly it's almost impossible to really keep track of it. I haven't worked a night shift in over a month, however I am now working a lot more nights for the next few weeks. Early shifts can be anything from a 0600 to 0900 start. Afternoons from 1200 to 1900 start and nights are the usual 2100 or 2200 start. Shifts are usually 10 hours in duration but there are some variations to that now. This is a brand new system and it seems unlikely that it will remain in this format, unfortunately you won't have any idea what pattern you will work until near the end of your training I imagine. Best of luck!
  7. The CSO role is so varied from area to area though, it also depends on how you like to work. It is a great way to gather experience to become a cop though, it definitely helped me when it comes to having the confidence to deal with people in a Policing context and I would go back and do it all over again if I had to. I don't know much about the prison service on the other hand. I am sure you will see me around on the Wirrral, I am all over the place at the moment so who knows maybe we will bump in to each other.
  8. The CSO role does differ slightly depending on the force you work for. From my experience you will be primarily be involved in crime prevention initiatives, providing reassurance for victims of crime, dealing with ASB and possibly taking crime reports for minor offences. You will more than likely be on foot or bicycle patrol but some CSO's are being issued with basic driving permits now, particularly here in Merseyside as the borders have changed and expanded dramatically. You may be involved in dealing with calls for service that do not need a Police Officer to attend, you may back up to emergency calls but that isn't strictly part of the role and will depend on your supervision and own discretion. You may have the power to detain, although I would urge caution when using it to avoid landing yourself in the brown stuff, that being said it is sometimes necessary! You will also be involved with local community meetings and you will have the chance to work on your own projects. I found one of the more satisfying jobs to be those that involved researching and working on a problem and then working with people to solve them in the longer term. It's a reasonably varied role though but your work depends a lot on where you work, who you work with and who your supervision is. I worked in Prescot as a CSO (just on the border with St Helens) but I now work on the Wirral on patrol. The new system does mean we end up all over the place now though.
  9. How do people know a warrant card is real?

    I suppose it's like anything else with regards to identity. You can add holograms and all manner of security features, but somebody on the street is not going to be in a position to tell a fake from the real thing! I have never had anybody question the validity of my identification as a PCSO, but then again that was a role that required me to be in uniform at all times when on duty. While I am now a PC, I am on a response block and as such I have not undertaken any plain clothed work yet. I would say the situation with regards to Police ID would be the same with anybody else if you had concerns. I would advise the member of the public to contact the control room with my collar number and they would verify my identity that way. In conclusion I can't see any way that would make a warrant card completely fool proof, however it is risky business for anybody brazen enough to attempt to forge one!
  10. It's a long road for some while some people get in reasonably quickly. I suppose I picked a horrible time to apply and I was determined to join Merseyside as my wife is a Constable here. It does seem from experience that those who apply once and get knocked back will either just sack the idea off, or they will come back fighting. Those that push for it usually seem to get in, even if it takes a while! PCSO is a good role to take as it gets you in to the organisation and gives you some good grounding for when you make the switch. Prison Officer similarly gives a wealth of experience and in general anything that involves dealing with difficult people to be honest. It is normal to feel bitter at first as well, I was furious when I failed and saw people get in after a mere months of effort. I just had to suck it up, feel sorry for myself for a bit and then come back swinging for the next attempt. Not only are you likely to achieve your goal in the end, but it will be so much sweeter when you do!
  11. I worked for West Yorkshire Police as a CSO for five years, good force and I had a good time there. People with your level of determination do well from experience so you will do just fine! It took my 7 years to finally get in so I am still on cloud nine at the moment. It's tough though and I have dealt with some pretty harrowing incidents already to be honest. Been out on response since 03/01/17 and absolutely loving it, especially now I am not tied down to being tutored. St Helens is not too bad generally, I guess it has it's issues like anywhere else but in the grand scheme of things it's not known for being too bad. Where abouts in St Helens have you moved to?
  12. Good on you! Which force have you transferred it to? It's strange how different forces have such different perspectives on things isn't it? All the best though and let us know how you get on!
  13. I feel for you Moopheus, it's a crushing scenario to say the very least. The vetting process is completely different for the Police than the armed forces or most other occupations though. I know people who have passed various levels of vetting for military jobs and are still rejected for the Police. A lot of the issue these days is the job is so frightened of being sued or data protection being breached. It is awful when people are rejected for matters out of their control, but unfortunately a family member or associate can derail an applicant pretty quickly. It's often a way to avoid putting people in a position where they will be under pressure to disclose information, misuse computer systems or even become a target themselves because of their position. Try not to take it personally (I know that's difficult), the job is under such intense scrutiny these days that it becomes extremely sensitive to any form of risk. I presume you have already tried to appeal the decision, but if not it's always worth fighting your corner. Just because Merseyside have rejected you doesn't mean Cheshire, GMP or Lancs would do the same. The decision is made by a vetting officer and there is always a possibility that another person would view your circumstances differently. I genuinely wish you all the best and hopefully you will get to where you want to be in future. It's a tough road, perhaps tougher for some than others but I am sure you will do well in whatever you do. Try not to be bitter about those that work for the organisation in the meantime though, only a tiny minority within have anything to do with recruitment and it doesn't reflect on us! Keep your chin up and don't give in!
  14. Vetting

    Neither of those situations would give any cause for concern. Being pulled over and breathalysed is definitely not an issue if you didn't exceed the limit. By all means declare them, it certainly demonstrates high levels of integrity, but it will not cause you any issues!
  15. S.37 doesn't specifically state the need to interview, it is simply to charge or ascertain if sufficient evidence exists to charge. If you are arresting to prevent bop it wouldn't really satisfy either, however that is where your scenario of preventing harm would come in to play.