mikeh2000

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mikeh2000 last won the day on June 4 2012

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About mikeh2000

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  1. Depending on the job you don't have to have your blue lights on when responding to a call, as having them on may get the offenders attention who will then have time to make off. The story says that the number of officers caught is exempt from public documents, it then goes on to say that any police drivers who could not justify speeding at the time were dealt with like another person would be. Why the figures are exempt I don't know, but could you imagine the uproar from certain members of the press if the force said 5000 officers were caught speeding, but only 10 were prosecuted? Certain papers would not be interested in the fact that the 4900 were justified in speeding, after putting their own 'spin' on it, they'd probably say less than 1% of officers caught speeding are prosecuted to make it a good headline. It's probably difficult to collate all the information on how many are speeding, for what reason, and if its justified, and getting staff to run around and collate the info needed takes time, and time is money, which in this climate, forces are unwilling to do if they don't have to.
  2. There's no way of answering those questions without knowing what he said in interview, whats said in the statement etc as there could be so many variables. The only person who could possibly answer them before court is a solicitor maybe, but even then what happens at court is anybodies guess.
  3. Throwing the sauce, as well as the slap are enough for common assault on their own, so although he denied slapping her, as he's admitted to throwing the sauce, that's probably why he's been charged and off to court. As its classed as domestic violence then even if the victim does change their mind, the case will still go ahead, even if it is against the victims wishes.
  4. Where I used to work our local MH hospital used to let people out for smoke breaks on 'trust' on their own, then when they didn't come back in and weren't in the grounds, would report them as missing. We used to get about 5 a week on average, the hospital though didn't count them as missing if they were eventually found, so there official figures stated they only had 1 missing person a year.
  5. Section 17 of PACE doesn't come under any of the above case law, and I've never left any paperwork re it as our forms don't cover section 17.
  6. If its a lawful order by supervision then its a discplinary offence to refuse to do it. The problem is that sometimes its impossible to say where not needed until we get there, and quite often when we do arrive, although not needed initially, our presence can quite often make the situation worse.
  7. In a word 'yes', like I said most of the time we shouldn't be attending, but if something did happen then guess who would be at fault, yep the officer who's told to go by supervision.
  8. Firepower, its usually supervision ie force controllers who order us to go there. Its quite normal now for officers tasked to attend these sort of jobs to pipe up, but with no social services about at the time, supervision then rely on that officers are there to protect life, which although very tenous in most cases, pretty much means the officer who protested has his hands tied. Sometime supervision do pass on their displeasure to social services or whoever, but nothings ever changed, if we get called we nearly always go.
  9. I've said it before and when I've been on supervisors courses we've been told that we won't be doing social services jobs, mental health joint visits unless they are violent etc and that if people start dying because of the Police not doing other services jobs, then so be it. That was 3 years ago now, nothings changed though because someone higher up always overrules and says that we will have to deal. I can't see it changing anytime soon, but with the impending cuts then who knows?
  10. The Police would have been called by the mental health team who attended, and from reading the story he was being violent in the ambulance, and trying to jump out the rear door. Bearing in mind that the ambulance crew cannot give him any sedatives, and due to his age if the Police had forcibly restrained him it would have probably resulted in broken bones(incidently what he died of a few weeks later), I'd love to know how else you would stop him from jumping out the back or side door, bearing in mind that if he succeeds and ends up dead the officer will more than likely be looking at gross misconduct for not doing his duty, ie preventing loss to life.
  11. Its common courtesy on this forum that if you do post a news story, then please add your own comments as well, Regards Mikeh2000
  12. They can make the request, and in 999 out of a 1000 requests it will be adhered to, but if its an urgent situation then in theory any officer can do the search. It is unlikely though as the chances are it will lead to a complaint.
  13. Males can search females and vice versa, its best practice not too and it can also attract complaints, but if there's no other officers about and a search has to be done there and then, its done by whatever officer is there, male or female.
  14. There's no difference between female and male officers, at the end of the day they're all officers, and someone has to be first on the scene.
  15. Going slightly off tangent, and if as you say the officers didn't explain themselves and were rude, our complaints department(PSD) have told us that complaints of rudeness have gone up by quite a significant margin, too which our Federation answered back that officers moral is so low with a most of them ready to leave if they could due to the pay cuts and everything else, then PSD should lay off them as it will make moral even lower, and as goodwill is pretty much gone in my force now, all it will do is affect the public in other ways.