techie1

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techie1 last won the day on December 31 2013

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  1. A dedicated police squad has been set up to protect hospital staff from violent patients amid rising Accident & Emergency chaos http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/04/17/police-squad-deployed-protect-nhs-staff-attacks/
  2. London gun owners are asking questions of the Metropolitan Police after the force seemingly handed the addresses of 30,000 firearm and shotgun owners to a direct mail marketing agency for a commercial firm's advertising campaign. https://www.theregister.co.uk/2017/04/19/met_police_30000_gun_owner_data_breach/
  3. Yes, policing has seen stability in this parliament – if your idea of stability is to be left constantly questioning what is going to happen and when things are going to get done, writes Ian Weinfass. Less than a year after becoming Prime Minister, the politician who had been the longest serving Home Secretary of modern times has called a general election in order to “guarantee certainty and stability for the years ahead”. "Last summer, after the country voted to leave the European Union, Britain needed certainty, stability and strong leadership, and since I became prime minister the government has delivered precisely that,” she proclaimed. The 2015-2017 Parliament will be the shortest since 1974 – but what certainty has it given to the country’s police officers? About the only one I can think of is that next to no one expects a pay rise of more than one per cent ever again. On so many other issues, nothing but questions remain. Former Chancellor George Osborne’s announcement that police funding will be protected in this parliament now reaches its expiry date in seven weeks. Will it now be discarded, preserved or, like new chocolate bars, made even smaller while pretending its the same size? Police funding rises to the top of the political agenda following terror attacks but then always disappears from view faster than an NPCC discussion about compulsory severance. So, will it even get a look-in during the campaign as Brexit, the NHS and education take centre stage? The waiting game Around three times as long has now been spent revising the police funding formula to try to remove the errors from it than was spent consulting on its first draft. “Demographics and demands on policing have dramatically changed in parts of the country and policing in general is completely different” since the formula was last revised – the then-Policing Minister told me in early 2015. His job has since been expanded to cover the fire service - and taken from him and given to someone else. Yet the wait for fair funding based on the modern world goes on. I’ve previously drawn a comparison between the failure to negotiate a funding formula from a budget entirely controlled by government (responsibility of T May), and the forthcoming Brexit negotiations. And those will need a higher level of technical knowledge in discussions with 27 other countries (responsibility of T May). If the latter goes as well as the former, we may as well quit the negotiations before they begin. After all there is only a 24-month time limit for Brexit, whereas at this rate the police funding formula consultation will probably be retired after 30 years. Elsewhere, former Prime Minister David Cameron’s review of protections for firearms officers was ordered in December 2015 after fears that those who used their weapons in order to protect the public would face increasingly face criminal investigations. He departed a few months later, but we have been told that the review continues. The recent heated-debates-via-public-statement between the IPCC and the NPCC, Police Federation and others about post incident procedures may have overshadowed the fact that we are still waiting for clarity from the top on the central issues. A national armed police force was mooted in 2015, producing uncertainty at the Civil Nuclear Constabulary, MOD Police and British Transport Police. While quietly advising that no full-blown merger would take place this parliament, the government said it would continue to work across Whitehall to “integrate infrastructure policing”. What now? There are many other issues which we simply do not know the likely trajectory of beyond the next couple of weeks (direct entry for chief officers, counter-extremist legislation and potential electoral fraud prosecutions among them). So yes, policing has seen stability in this parliament – if your idea of stability is to be left constantly questioning what is going to happen and when things are going to get done. View on Police Oracle
  4. The officer had been making inquiries following complaints about travellers in the area... but couldn't resist a go when he spotted the empty playpark https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/3344570/fun-loving-policeman-takes-break-from-job-to-have-a-go-on-a-zipline-as-he-larks-about-in-kids-playground/ Must be a slow news day...
  5. A North Yorkshire fire crew attending a 999 call was sent to the wrong address by a control room based more than 400 miles away. The Harrogate crew was wrongly sent two and half miles from where it should have been by call operators working in Cornwall. North Yorkshire and Cornwall fire and rescue services share control room operations at peak periods. The North Yorkshire service confirmed an investigation is under way. It said crews attending the business park fire at Killinghall, near Harrogate, were delayed 10 minutes as a result of the mix-up, but the Fire Brigades Union (FBU) said fire engines were 17 minutes late. Simon Wall, chairman of North Yorkshire FBU, said: "The delay could have been catastrophic if it had been a house fire." Wednesday's call was handled by the Critical Control Centre in Tolvaddon, Cornwall,. Mr Wall said "collaborating with Cornwall means there is a massive lack of local knowledge". He added: "The collaboration between control centres is what the government wants and we accept that, but an incident like this is unacceptable. "Something has gone desperately wrong." North Yorkshire and Cornwall control room collaboration Launched: August 2016 Cost: £3.6m Cornwall base: Tolvaddon - handles about 10,500 emergency calls per year North Yorkshire base: Northallerton - handles about 15,000 emergency calls per year Aim: Exchanging control rooms at peak times Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service said: "When it is busy other control rooms in the region are likely to be busy, so "by choosing to work with North Yorkshire we are in a better position to be able to have our emergency calls answered during busy times". North Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service said: "Cornwall's Control Room will be able to seamlessly receive calls and dispatch resources on behalf North Yorkshire (and vice versa), during busy periods." Owen Hayward, North Yorkshire Assistant Chief Fire Officer, confirmed an investigation is under way with Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service. He said: "We are not yet sure if someone gave us the wrong postcode or something went wrong in the control room." No-one was available for comment from Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-39614096
  6. Oversight of second emergency service will transfer to the politicians if approved by Home Office Nine police and crime commissioners have been given a share of £1 million to help with their proposals to take over local fire services. The money comes from the Home Office, which will also have the final say on whether the hoped-for takeovers can go ahead. PCCs for Sussex, West Mercia, Essex, Cambridgeshire, Northamptonshire, Hertfordshire, Gloucestershire, Staffordshire and North Yorkshire have been granted a slice of the cash. Minister for Policing and the Fire Service Brandon Lewis said: “PCCs taking on responsibility for fire and rescue services will lead to the same level of public accountability for both services. “I am pleased to support those PCCs who are developing proposals to take on governance of local fire and rescue services.” The Home Office says the money “will ensure that the work and knowledge gained is properly disseminated amongst the policing community”. But not all of the PCCs who are being granted the cash are fully committed to taking on fire service governance. Gloucestershire’s Martin Surl has previously told PoliceOracle.com that he has a “genuinely open mind” and wants to commission research on the issue. Others such as Essex’s Roger Hirst and Hertfordshire’s David Lloyd have said they want to take over from fire authorities, and have already set out their plans to do so. View on Police Oracle
  7. A herd of up to 60 cows are standing on a train platform in Kent, delaying Southern Rail trains. http://www.standard.co.uk/news/transport/herd-of-60-cows-invade-station-platform-in-hever-forcing-southern-rail-to-delay-trains-a3515716.html I bet everyone that herd that announcement thought it was just another excuse from Southern Railway!!!
  8. The Scottish Police Federation (SPF) has said a violent incident in Glasgow raised questions about whether officers can protect the public. SPF chairwoman Andrea MacDonald said it was "deeply worrying" that no armed officers were dispatched. The attacker in Thursday's incident injured two people before inflicting fatal injuries on himself. Police Scotland has insisted that the incident did not require the presence of armed officers. One of the victims of the attack was reported to be in a stable condition in hospital with injuries to his shoulder and arm. The other victim, a community warden, was allowed home after treatment. Ms MacDonald said: "Had the assailant been intent on harming large numbers of the public, he could have done so with impunity and the police would have been largely powerless to stop him. "Whilst not detracting in any way from the courage of the police officers who attended, the fact no armed officers were dispatched to a man attacking others with knives and an axe should be deeply worrying. "Glasgow is a city with an almost permanent armed police presence but they were not dispatched and they did not attend." She added: "This lays bare the myth that the service adequately risk-assesses incidents prior to deploying resources and that as a service we are capable of protecting the public from spontaneous incidents of extreme violence." The SPF annual conference - last month - heard calls for all officers to carry Tasers and for there to be an increase in the number of armed officers. Police Scotland has rejected these calls and stressed the value of retaining a largely unarmed police service. Assistant Chief Constable Wayne Mawson said: "Police Scotland, along with the rest of the UK, prides itself in being an unarmed service with access to specialist firearms support whenever required. "Yesterday's incident in Glasgow city centre was a dynamic and fast-moving incident. Local officers responded rapidly and contained and dealt with it quickly. "This was not a random attack. It was planned and targeted, and armed officers were not required to attend on this occasion." Detectives have appealed for information about what they said was a "targeted" and pre-planned attack. The incident has been referred to the Police Investigations and Review Commissioner (PIRC). http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-39604233
  9. The 11-year-old police-mad boy managed to raise £150,000 for Brain Tumour Research before he died. The force surprised the family of Finlay Church at his old school with the pooch A new West Midlands Police dog has been named in memory of a boy who dreamed of becoming a police officer. German Shepherd Finn is named after 11-year-old Finlay Church who managed to raise over £150,000 for Brain Tumour Research and Birmingham Children’s Hospital before he died from brain cancer in November 2015. The boy, who had a passion for policing, organised a series of fundraisers after his diagnosis including achieving a world record for the longest line of teddies. After making an “unforgettable” impression on staff when he achieved a long held ambition to spend a couple of days with the force, they decided to name one of their latest crime fighting hounds in his honour. Police staff surprised Finlay’s family by arriving at his old Alvechurch Middle School with the 12-week-old pup last Friday while they were organising a fundraising Wear A Hat Day in aid of brain tumour research. Finlay’s mum Penny said: "This is the most wonderful gesture to have a police dog named in honour of Fin. "West Midlands Police has always been incredibly supportive of us and our fundraising work and to keep Fin’s legacy alive in this way is very humbling. “He loved dogs and desperately wanted to be an armed response officer so this really is a fitting tribute. “We can’t thank the Dogs Unit enough for enabling police dog Finn to live out Fin’s aspirations." Family, friends and the force have carried on raising money for Brain Tumour Research and last year West Midlands Police hats helped to set an unusual record relating to headwear placed in a row as part of their efforts. Sergeant Phil McMullen, who took part in some of the charity events, said: "Finlay was an aspiring police officer and we were all deeply saddened when he passed away. "He wanted to help others which is one of the greatest qualities a PC can have "We had discussed the idea of naming a police dog after Finlay and this seemed a nice time to surprise his family. "Finn the dog struck up an instant bond with them and we hope he will soon be out on the beat to help the public - just like his namesake." Read on Police Oracle
  10. BBC: Senior officers back Plymouth tea break police Senior police officers have defended a group of officers at the centre of controversy over a seaside tea break. Eight officers from Plymouth Police E section emergency response team were pictured in The Sun on Plymouth Hoe with a headline: Thin Brew Line. "Policing is full of wonderful real people... and all need to eat and drink!," Chief Constable Olivia Pinkney of Hampshire Police tweeted. Devon and Cornwall Police were unavailable for immediate comment. The paper pointed out the officers had stopped for 45 minutes at The Coffee Shack, which under police regulations they are allowed to do during an eight-hour shift. But officers took exception to the "anti-police" coverage with Chief Constable Simon Edens of Northamptonshire Police, tweeting: "I encourage all officers & staff in @NorthantsPolice to take their break when they can, in or outside their station. #takeabreak #wellbeing." Chief Constable Andy Cooke of Merseyside Police tweeted: "Shock horror. Police officers taking a break and drinking tea. In public! Brilliant scoop. Makes you proud of the British press." Plymouth Police E section emergency response team tweeted: "We have been inundated with messages of support.As a thankyou the brews are on us if you are ever in our part of the world.#brewsforblues." "I was as upset about the way it was used as anyone and it was unfair but the officers did not help themselves," he said. A Coffee Shack spokesman said: "If anything it was good PR for the police - at least you can go up and talk to them which you can't if they're passing in a patrol car." No-one was available for immediate comment from The Sun. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-39608253
  11. Police have hit back at a national newspaper after it pictured a group of officers having a cup of tea at a Devon seaside cafe. This morning the Sun newspaper ran a story which stated that eight uniformed police officers stopped for a 45 minute break while on shift for a cuppa and a bacon sarnie at a cafe on the promenade at Plymouth Hoe http://www.devonlive.com/police-shame-the-sun-as-officers-pictured-drinking-tea-at-seaside-cafe-in-devon/story-30271556-detail/story.html
  12. British Transport police say incident at Livingston North station near Edinburgh could have derailed a train https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/apr/14/police-hunt-youths-ladder-railway-tracks-livingston-north-edinburgh
  13. Over 1,300 police officers are suing the PSNI chief constable George Hamilton for holiday pay. http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/1300-police-officers-to-sue-psni-chief-hamilton-for-holiday-pay-35622714.html
  14. In response to the stats, the Home Office claims its reforms are working. Britain's largest police force has recorded a surge in violent, gun and knife crime in what officers warned is a national phenomenon. Scotland Yard registered annual rises across a number of serious offence categories in the last 12 months, following several years of falls. There were jumps in robbery, theft, violence, gun and knife crime in 2016/17 in London and police say the pattern is being replicated around the country. The disclosures will reignite the debate over resources following warnings from a string of senior figures over the impacts of further budget squeezes on forces. They also come weeks after watchdogs issued a stark warning over the "potentially perilous" state of British policing, and lay bare the challenges facing new Scotland Yard chief Cressida Dick. Statistics published by the Metropolitan Police show that: Gun crime increased by more than two fifths (42%) year-on-year with 2,544 offences recorded in 2016/17 Knife crime jumped by almost a quarter (24%), with more than 4,000 offences involving blades resulting in an injury The total number of offences recorded by the force rose by nearly 4.6% from 740,933 to 774,737 Violence against the person crimes were up by 4.7% while there were also increases in robberies (12%), sex offences (9%) and theft (7%) There were 110 homicides - one more than the previous year Sanction detection rates - the proportion of cases where action is taken against a suspect such as a charge or caution - were down across a number of categories As the figures were released, officers raised the alarm over a shift in knife crime which has seen the proportion of youngsters carrying blades who are affiliated with gangs fall from around a third to approximately a quarter. Officers reported an increasing trend for youths in the capital to keep blades on them for protection rather than in order to carry out crime. Assistant Commissioner Martin Hewitt said: "Young people carrying knives are doing so for a variety of reasons including status, criminality and self-protection but only around a quarter are affiliated with gangs. "There is a phenomenon of people feeling that you need to carry a knife to be safe. There is a lot greater sense that 'I need this to protect myself'. The problem comes when you then get a confrontation." The Met has launched investigations into three separate fatal stabbings in the capital since the start of the week. On the overall crime figures, Mr Hewitt insisted that London is "one of the safest global cities in the world". He said: "Similar to the rest of England and Wales, crime rates in London are rising, but many of these are still at a much lower level than five years ago and are against the backdrop of significant reductions in resources." The force has closed dozens of police stations and lost hundreds of staff as it made savings totalling hundreds of millions of pounds since 2010, although officer numbers have remained broadly steady at around 31,000. Deputy London Mayor for Policing Sophie Linden, said: "These figures are deeply disturbing, and a stark reminder of the enormous pressure our police are under every day as they work so tirelessly to protect us." In response to the worrying figures the Home Office highlighted improvements in violent crime rates elsewhere but acknowledged more had to be done. A spokeswoman said: "Police reform is working, with the latest ONS figures showing crimes traditionally measured by the (British Crime) Survey have fallen by a third since 2010 to a record low, with over 370,000 fewer violent crimes a year. "Every violent crime is a significant concern and this Government is taking action to tackle it and keep our communities safe, including through actions set out in our Modern Crime Prevention Strategy. "Last year, we banned zombie knives, extended our work with retailers to prevent underage sales of knives and supported police in a week of action where they seized more than 1,200 weapons and made 300 arrests. "We know there is more to be done. We will continue to work with the police, retailers and voluntary groups to tackle knife crime and ensure support is available for victims of gang violence and exploitation." View on Police Oracle
  15. Chairman of the Scottish Police Federation described the payments a "significant issue" for members The Scottish Police Federation is challenging Police Scotland over special payments to armed officers who protect the royal family on holiday. Police Scotland stopped enhanced payments to officers for the previous two summers for protecting Her Majesty The Queen and the Royals while they holidayed in the Highlands. In the past the force made the payments due to officers being far away from friends and family and remained “on call”. However, the “held in reserve” payments have been ditched as Police Scotland attempts to close a £190 million funding gap by 2021, according to the Sunday Post. The situation has resulted in an officer, backed by the fed, initiating a judicial review of the decision at the highest civil court in Scotland, the Court of Session. The officer bringing the case is one of many who provide protection for the Royals costing an estimated £100 million per year. Prior to the unification of Scottish forces providing protection for the Royals was the responsibility of the eight regional forces dependent on where the Windsors were. This meant officers were able to return home after being on duty and, as such, did not qualify for the payments. Police Scotland argue the officers based at Balmoral do not qualify for the payments despite them being enshrined in rules by the Police Negotiating Board. A decision on the matter is expected in the next few weeks and general secretary of the Scottish Police Federation Calum Steele says they had “little option” but to pursue the matter legally. He said: “This is a significant issue for our officers. “The force has changed its approach to the reimbursement of officers and we are challenging it. “We have tried to resolve this long before the Court of Sessions action but feel little option but to go down the legal route.” A spokesman for Police Scotland said: “We will not comment on this as it involves an active legal case.” View on Police Oracle