badtoro

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badtoro last won the day on October 29 2016

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  1. you can also find a pdf document called know your rights no.3 here: https://staffordshire.polfed.org/images/stories/pdf/know-your-rights-3.pdf
  2. I may be wrong but I don't think the question was actually ever answered. In regards to situation/scenario questions posed at the interview (not SEARCH) there isn't a right or wrong answer as such. These questions are often based on real life multiple emergency calls you may be asked to attend, all incidents happening at the same time at various distances from your current location and various degrees of information provided for each call. A question could be for instance in which order would you attend those incidents? it is up to you to decide and explain your reasons behind your answers, expect to be challenged on one or more of those answers. You don't need to have a police background in order to successfully pass really, it's more about common sense, see how flexible you are and justify your actions as well as carefully read the information you were provided. Hope this answers the original question.
  3. Lamb (...and no, i havent broken the game, just making it more challenging lol)
  4. My personal thoughts on the subject. Surely it is not about complaining, it's about the level of training received, experienced/skills gained (beyond classroom), professionalism, and invaluable support given to their regular counterparts. Mind you, it's not just an issue the police face, it's quite similar with the regular and reserve army too for instance. The difference? the army reservists do get paid. It's the most difficult conundrums for all, both regulars and specials/reservists. I do believe the standards are much better these days, but the bad reputation the specials and reservists alike have given to their respective forces/services it's hard to shake off. In the example of the army there are outstanding examples of reservists who fought in the frontline and at times it must be said they exceeded their regular counterparts in their roles, I am absolutely sure the same applies to the Specials. Having said that, as a whole, finding exceptional, motivated characters both in the special constabulary and in the reserve army is quite uncommon. It cannot just be blamed to the single individual either. The training packages supplied and the lack of long term on the job training provided aimed mainly at fast tracking individuals into a very difficult and intensive job, do affect the end results. Lack of experience, motivation and a general inadequacy eventually show in the level of quality of service provided to the community and support to the regulars. It should not be the main driving force, but, what's the incentive for the specials to do a good job and go above and beyond what they are expected to do? when it's a grey wet cold day, worked 8+ hrs already, have a family and you're volunteering in a very demanding job? In all honesty, how many will driven individuals are out there with such a strong character and mission in life to turn up and give their 100%? We all know the answer. Again, let's not just focus on the single positive outstanding individual I am sure we all have come across, in general, that's the point, as a whole, we know what the answer is, there aren't many out there. This doesn't mean we should generalise in our approach to the specials/reservists, absolutely not, it is down to each and every individual regular police officer to give the specials an opportunity to shine. As I said before it ain't easy.
  5. Although it's always a personal decision, the number of 'strikes' are irrelevant. How much do you want to 'nail' that job? How important is it for you? Interviewing is an art, we all can be good at it, we need preparation and practice.The key is to understand and analyse what your weaknesses and your strengths are. The 'trick' for all job interviews is to fully evidence one's suitability to the role. What does the panel wants to hear? Why should they give you the job? What can you give the role that someone else can't? You need to master the competencies and be ready to give real examples. A lot of preparation is required and it isn't easy, I personally hated getting ready for the interview, and I hated even more the fake SEARCH scenarios, yet I asked myself how much I wanted to join, was it worth all the work and preparation? So, if indeed the interview is the only part that lets you down, I see no reason why you could not to get some coaching and guidance. It may sound awkward but for some people it's a good idea when preparing for an interview to sit/stand in front of a mirror and see what the interview panel will see. It's about the image you project, it's about how your present yourself, it is also about mannerisms, gestures etc. It's about pacing yourself when speaking, key point think before answering, short pauses after a questions are fine, it shows you're thinking what to say next and it helps you formulate the answer in a way that shows your confident and know what you want and why you want it. It may help too recording yourself, playing it back to check how you did, best of all why not asking a friend / family to listen / see your interview and provide you with some pointers? How about having them set up a mock interview, and see how well you perform under pressure. I think being interviewed by a family/friend is a frightening thought, but i do believe if you performed well there you'll def perform great at a real interview. Mental strength is critical to become confident in front of an audience. Whatever you decide to do, good luck!
  6. There's no need to dress smartly for your biometrics, it's not an interview. I wore a tshirt and jeans. Same goes for SEARCH, medical appointments or stores, smart dress is not a requirement either, whatever you're comfortable wearing, as long as you dress tastefully it won't be a problem.
  7. I thought there were enough nerds in this forum playing the game.... ok, i will help as it isnt broken (see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rdesktop)
  8. I'm using pocket sergeant
  9. Surrey only accept transfer of the CKP and the National Assessment Centre score. Vetting, Medicals and Biometrics will need to be completed all again.
  10. Welcome to the forum...ask away!
  11. Not sure why you are assuming. If I may say, you should not assume in a vetting form. Do you have a naturalisation certificate? Do you have a birth certificate? Do you have a British passport? Those are the questions you should be asking yourself I believe and take it from there.