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Western Australia Police are Recruiting (Closing Date: 22/5/13)


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#41 HarryBosch

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:03 PM

Stu, thanks for the reply. Really appreciate it.

With the economy fluctuating so much and the population increasing rapidly is a move to WA from Scotland as attractive as it was about 10 years ago?
The salary scale on the website is for base rate and includes penalty rates. Are these penalty rates paid per shift? I also heard there was a scheme in place whereby you paid mortgage direct from wages before tax is calculated thus saving on tax. Is that correct?

Again, sorry to bombard you but forearmed is forewarned etc etc.

Regards,

HB

#42 Scooter

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:04 AM

Hi HB

 

I am in the middle of returning from the UK (holiday) and have spoken with quite a few UK police both retired and currently serving. The job appears very much the same in Australia as it is in the UK except the UK conditions and wages are crap, although with the recently falling Aussie dollar not so bad now. Officially we get 6 weeks annual leave a year, 3 months extra leave (long service) after serving 10 years, then another 3 months every seven after that. If you serve above the 26th parallel you get an extra 2 weeks annual leave due to remoteness and you what is called a free pass to the coast. (the cost of travelling to Perth is reimbursed).

 

I have to admit I enjoy the job still, although I work in a small country town north of Perth, The station has more of you blokes than locals and we all get along real well both professionally and socially. " Debriefing" is an important part of country policing. If you decide to move to the bush and police there (you will have to volunteer as you are no longer forced to go) you will most likely do integrated duties which basically means everything from, community policing, GD's. traffic. sudden deaths, coronial investigations, fatal crash investigations, prosecuting and station auditing. (commonly called a BAMR where all the stuff is checked to make sure its not all out of control.) In the city you generally stick to one facet, eg traffic or enquires etc.

 

We have this thing call " Tenure policy" This is where you find a great spot you like doing in the job, you get really good at it and become hugely knowledgeable about it, then the department forces you to move to another spot (you may not like) after about 4 years. Its designed to prevent you from being happy too long in one spot. (apparently that is bad!) So be aware,

 

Personally I prefer the country to the city......contrary to official policy you do police differently in the bush than you do in the city. Every country has its own set of issues, we are trying had to emulate the UK and make the same mistakes that have occurred there, only well probably do it a bit faster. Pay is a lot better in WA, leave and allowances are better to, if you decide to go bush they are even better. You blokes seem to like the beach and sun, well there is plenty of that, housing is not cheap but it is generally good, power and services are expensive, I pay about $450 every 2 months for power. ( I run a large swimming pool though).

 

WA will be what you decide to make it. I have been transferred to some pretty rubbish spots but really enjoyed them. It will be harder with a family other than a single person generally because you cant please everyone and you get the old comparisons being made between the two countries. The beer is better in the UK. Personal opinion of course. The job will be the same just with different procedures.

 

 

Any other specific questions drop me a PM

 

Regards

 

Scooter



#43 Scooter

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:20 AM

Stu, thanks for the reply. Really appreciate it.

With the economy fluctuating so much and the population increasing rapidly is a move to WA from Scotland as attractive as it was about 10 years ago?
The salary scale on the website is for base rate and includes penalty rates. Are these penalty rates paid per shift? I also heard there was a scheme in place whereby you paid mortgage direct from wages before tax is calculated thus saving on tax. Is that correct?

Again, sorry to bombard you but forearmed is forewarned etc etc.

Regards,

HB

Hi HB again,

 

At the moment you cannot pay off your mortgage as mentioned yet as a copper, you can do superannuation contributions, vehicles and a computer but that's about it. I know nurses have that option but its not available for us at the moment.

 

I haven't seen the WAPOL website but It would be hard to include penalty rates. Base rates are easy as you do 40 hrs a week at what ever your pay scale is. I get about $400 average a fortnight as penalty rates. These include shift penalties and meal penalties.  Overtime is on top of that, which is time and a half for the first 3 hours of the week, then double time there after till the end of the week, where it will start over again. Heaps of opportunities for overtime if you want it.



#44 HarryBosch

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:30 AM

Scooter, thanks for all the information. It's really helpful and allows us to make an informed decision (although in my head I'm there).
Should I get through the process I'll be coming over with my wife and 2 kids 9, 6 respectively.

In respect of the police. Up here in Scotland we can choose to bank any extra hours worked and get extra time off. I.e save up 40 hours and take a week off. Is there a similar opportunity in WA?Also, what kind of shift pattern is in operation in the Metropoolitan area and is there a big social scene for the police family?

Appreciate the help mate

HB

#45 stu4537

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:47 AM

Thanks HB and thanks Scooter for filling in some of the blanks.

I think it is still in place, if you are working above the 26th parallel, you actually work a 44 hr week, I can't remember if you got extra annual leave or pay in lieu.

 

HB, Scooter got it spot on, it's what you make it. One thing I did learn quick was not to harp on about how we did the job in the UK, a lot of the older hands got peed off with that. (There were 4 ex UK Cops in my Academy Class and we really upset the instructors telling them how we did it in the UK) There are differences but WA is catching up with the rest of the world pretty quickly. 

The only country posting I did not like was a small south west town as OIC. I did not have a re-directed phone to the regional office and I am sure there was not one single night for nearly eight months that I was not woken up by some numpty who had run out of petrol  or some other minor non police matter.  I burnt out real quick but after I was transferred back to the city following promotion, I had a great time again.

 

It's a big move, especially with a family and you will either love it or hate it. I'm still here and even on my retirement pay I can afford to go back to Blighty every couple of years and go on a Cruise in between the big holidays. The long service leave that Scooter was talking about is a great bonus, three months paid leave after the first 10 years then seven years after that.  In my time ( I sound like an old fart :-) ) we had did 7 + 7 + 7 years. When you retire, you are paid pro rata for untaken long service leave as well. 

Plus, and it is a big plus - is the weather. I kid you not, we are in the middle of winter and I was working in the garden this morning without a shirt on...fantastic!



#46 stu4537

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 08:51 AM

Hey Scooter, where are you stationed...

 

Stu



#47 Scooter

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 11:28 AM

Stu,

 

I am currently in Gingin and loving it. I have done Leonora, Warburton for a short stint, Roebourne, EPLU or Watch house (As punishment for telling the truth, but thoroughly loved it!), Traffic Enforcement Group and now Gingin. Great to be back in a country spot far away from DO. This site is monitored and now I've said I love the spot, they will probably force me out. I take it 4537 is your Regimental? If so you probably know Larry TURNER 4919. My first OIC and who "gently" assisted in bringing my paperwork up to speed. 

 

Sadly policing has changed even in the 14 years I've been doing it. Still have a ball though.

 

HB I love Scotland, for the love of GOD why are you coming out here? Sure the pays better, longer holidays, better healthcare, vegemite, weather is sunny all the time and the Scottish in particular,r can swim all year round here and its a great place to bring up kids BUT you have awesome motorcycle roads and heaps better beer/ales, haggis, black pud and porridge, the three key ingredients to eternal happiness Twisties (roads), food and ale. Sadly I put on 10 kg whilst over there in short time and have to do some infernal exercise program to be able to pass my military fitness test.  Which reminds me. We also get 4 weeks paid military leave if you wish to joins the SAS (Saturdays and Sundays Army) or the reserves or territorial army etc. In this instance you are paid by the police (full wage) AND you get paid by the army at a TAX FREE rate.  In my instance about $140 per day. You can apply for more military leave but it will only be at top up rates and you need the approval from the Super.

 

And to answer you other question you are talking about what we call TOIL ( Time Off In Liu) Rules are if you accrue it you have to take within a specified time or you get it paid out as overtime. (devastating I know.)  We get so much leave over here, we actually have a leave liability policy..... This is where you have so much leave outstanding you are forced to take leave, sometimes months at a time.  OIC's generally have this problem though.  Hope it helps.....

 

If you do come over, slip out with the family  for a beer and I'll show you around.

 

Scooter



#48 HarryBosch

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 08:25 PM

Scooter,

I'm already looking forward to that beer. Where are you staying? (my sister-in-law stays in Perth. Do you know her :) I'll even try and smuggle in some Haggis and Black pudding for you. You're right. Scotland is a great country but its slowly being ruined by politicians and the self-entitled who want everything but don't want to work for it.
The job is also changing up here, even in my short time in the force, thanks to the Strathclydeification of procedures. It makes sense though. What better model of policing to adopt than one which has resulted in the total alienation of the public. ( rolls eyes sarcastically )

What kind of shift pattern do you do? At present we do a rotation of Nights, rest days, backs, rest days, earlies, rest days, nights etc etc

And finally, no matter the country I'm in, I always find beer enjoyable.

#49 Scooter

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 08:57 PM

HB

 

Your shifts will depend on your position, how busy the location is and what needs are required to be addressed. Where I work we have a days/afternoons shifts. The ideal is a week of days followed by a week of arvo's and repeat.  We do four ten hour shifts then have three days off, on occasions you will get the 3 days off back to back and get the week off.   These shift start times can vary. Ask recruitment for a copy of the sworn EBA. This lists what you can and cant do in regards to shift times, meals breaks, overtime, leave and rostering. Country policing is completely different to city policing. In the country things are generally more relaxed and you can become an integral part of the community. Eg in Leonora and Roebourne I was also a volunteer ambo and firey when not on duty as a copper due to the community need. You can actually have and develop relationships with stakeholders as well as community members. In Perth you will rush from job to job.  It comes down to what you prefer.

 

You will most likely enjoy the change of pace. I haven't met many from the UK who haven't.

 

I live in the district I police, when your over, call the station (95755600) and we can catch up.

 

Scooter



#50 HarryBosch

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:27 PM

Will do mate. No too far from the college ;)

The big question is - how do I get the haggis and Black pudding sent to you??????

#51 stu4537

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 08:16 AM

Scooter, I served in Leonora, (1973?) they were building the "new" station when I was there. That was an eye opener. We could only receive ABC radio until about 7pm then zilch - no tv.  I read a lot of books and wore out my LP's.  But I still had a great time - it's totally different policing, especially when they power station closed down every night after the pubs closed.

I know Larry very well, we were at Perth Traffic.

If you still ride a bike we might have to recruit you into the new Police Motorcycle Club of WA and ESMA (Emergency Services Motorcycle Association).

 

HB - I totally agree with Scooter, I loved Scotland , did a driving holiday all around few years back. I was gob-smacked going through the Cairngorms. I could'nt work out what the tall sticks were at the side of the road, then someone told me. We have something similar on roads subject to flooding but they are rarely more than 3', not 15 - 20 ' like those on the Cairngorm roads - thats scary.

 

Best memory - stayed a couple of nights at thDrumnadrochit Hotel, asked the shopkeeper at the souvenir shop a couple of doors down, if anyone had seen the monster recently. Without a pause he said Yes, shes in back cooking lunch. 

 

Good luck with you application, hope to see you here soon.

 

Stu



#52 HarryBosch

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 09:18 AM

Stu/Scooter.

Scotland is a paradise for a driving holiday. Unfortunately the weather is terrible and the last few summers were a washout. Add in the scourge of the Midge ( like tiny Mosqitos with wee man syndrome and plenty of back up) and enjoying the outdoors can be very challenging.
My in-laws stayed just up the road from Drumnadrochit on the banks of Loch Ness. Very picturesque it was. Also very wet all year round.

In relation to the benefits offered by WA police.
1. Is the Medical benefit for officers and their families?
And
2. Just how do you handle patrolling in the heat?

Once again thanks for the information guys. It's very much appreciated.

HB

#53 Scooter

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 02:20 PM

HB

 

1. The medical benefits are limited to employees only, the family misses out. However they do offer a relatively good deal through an agency that is quite reasonable if you desire private health care.  Other than that medicare ( equivalent of the NHS) is not too bad.

 

As coppers we are not entitled to workers comp. Outrageous I know.... So that's the reason why we get 6 months sick leave a year. The cops will pay to patch you up and chuck in a bit of rehab if you need it. I have copped numerous injuries on the job so know the system pretty well. You can score a bit of criminal compensation if you injured as a result of an offence, but sweet bugger all else. Health and welfare can be a bit hit and miss when attempting to look after you after being injured I have discovered. I know many police that don't rate them at all.

 

2. How to handle patrolling in the heat? Wear your hat, sunscreen and stay in the air-conditioned car. Haven't seen a foot patrol for years, which is why so many of us are fat I suppose. Its only hot for about 2 months of the year and will only get to about 45 degrees for about 2 weeks where I am. Perth hits 43 on the odd occasion but mostly high to mid 30's for a couple of months.

 

May have to make the Haggis here, Customs are pretty hot on people bringing in food to Australia.

 

Regards

 

Scooter



#54 HarryBosch

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Posted 15 August 2013 - 09:28 AM

Scooter, once again thanks for the reply.

Ah good old customs eh. There I was fresh after the 19 hour plane ride and full of the joys having finally arrived in Oz to visit family. 2004 it was. A day etched on my memory as I met my first bonafide Australian. Yes, a customs officer. Possibly the grumpiest, most sullen looking individual I've ever had the misfortune to offer a greeting too. Scarred me it did.

Anyway, perhaps you can answer a few more of my, by now, banal questions.

Shift pattern? How far in advance do you get it? Over here its about 37,000 years in advance which makes planning for childcare a schoosh.

Any current high profile operations on going that you know about that I should know about?

Feel free to PM me details if you'd prefer.

Right, that's all for now mate. I'm now off to start sewing oats and a sheeps stomach in to the lining of my Bermudas. That grumpy, sullen looking chap is about to meet his match.

Regards,

HarryBosch




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