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Contemp Interviews


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#1 specialconstable1

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 06:02 AM

Anyone got any tips or tricks on Contemp Interviews?

When you give the caution +2 (free to leave etc)
How does this affect you if the person does exactly that?

What are you goals of the interview? Getting answers for points to prove?

#2 Tim in the South

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 09:05 AM

I rarely use contemp interviews (only because of the nature of my role) but when I did, I used to consider it in the same way as an interview after arrest (excluding of course the person isn't under arrest). I used to explain why I was conducting a contemp interview rather than arrest and interview - and everyone I did that too appreciated it. It also of course doesn't show up on PNC which is usually a bonus for the suspect.

After 'free to leave' - if the person does that, is it appropriate to arrest? As you are investigating a criminal offence, for which this person is a suspect (I assume) then if departing is likely to happen, or does happen, I'd arrest.

I've only conducted contemp interviews for offences such as minor criminal damage, RTI etc..

#3 SimonT

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:18 AM

I have done plengty for minor stuff like shoplifting, take the person home, interview in front of parents etc. Much time saves.

Now we have to give them a solicitor if they want one for free and have to read out a long piece of information stating we cant possibly interview them without a solicitor if they want one. Suddenly a 10 min contemp can take 1-2 hours of sitting about for the solicitor. So far less contemt now

#4 Traffic Rat

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 12:03 PM

After 'free to leave' - if the person does that, is it appropriate to arrest? As you are investigating a criminal offence, for which this person is a suspect (I assume) then if departing is likely to happen, or does happen, I'd arrest.


Tim,, I think this is why the change to Code G was brought in. At the end of the day if they want to leave before the interview is ended thats there look out, they have been offered an opportunity to explain an incident/allegation, they dont want to, let the courts sort it out

#5 Sectioned Detection

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 04:45 PM

Problem is if you don't put the questions to them you cans draw inference from them.

EDIT: can't draw inference.

#6 Felix.

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:24 PM

I use these quite a lot on response now. By the time you arrest someone, call for a van, wait in the holding room, get them booked in, fingerprints etc etc - you could have contemp interviewed them 5 times over.

You can do it in you pocket note book and if they want toleave early, then thats there look out - you have given them the opportinuity (its like a no reply interview)

Really useful tool if you have a job thats going no where and you want to get rid of it

#7 ManchesterKathy

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 12:47 AM

They're only entitled to free and independent legal advice if the interview takes place at the police station. Otherwise the entitlement is to independent legal advice at their own expense. At the end of the interview tell them they'll be reported for summons and do the 'now caution.' Record any reply they make and get them to sign. Very useful for dealing with shoplifters in the shop if you can verify their name and address. Once the person has been summoned or convicted you can then require them to attend the station for fingerprints, photograph and DNA to be taken. If they fail to attend for this they commit an offence.

#8 SimonT

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:23 AM

Recent changes mean that at least in my force you are entitled to a free solicitor anywhere for any interview.

#9 znra251

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:17 PM

Tim,, I think this is why the change to Code G was brought in. At the end of the day if they want to leave before the interview is ended thats there look out, they have been offered an opportunity to explain an incident/allegation, they dont want to, let the courts sort it out


The COP was changed exactly for this reason. The theory is more people should come to the station voluntarily and be interviewed. If they want to leave the new code is pretty clear that the prompt and effective by interview criteria then kicks in so they can be arrested!

#10 Ed67812

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 10:41 PM

They're only entitled to free and independent legal advice if the interview takes place at the police station. Otherwise the entitlement is to independent legal advice at their own expense.

 

As Simon T has said, this is now wrong.......entitlement to legal advice free of charge is now true ANYWHERE, Police station or not. I know a lot of forces have forms with pre written interviews for some offences, in particular cannabis street cautions, that currently only have the caution and not under arrest bits included but do not mention right to free and ind legal advice, which will need to change.

 

If you miss that bit out, then any interview following will be worth less than the paper it is written on.



#11 Inyanga

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:23 AM

Yeah! I agree. Our force gives us a telephone number that we dial (not give it to MOP) and give the operator a mobile number of the individual being interviewed. If the person doesn't have a mobile number, you will need to arrange an appointment for them to attend a police station.
If you don't adhere to that then it's a NFA file.




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