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Young Drivers...


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#1 kenworthy

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:08 AM

Young drivers may face a ban on carrying passengers who are not members of their family as the Government seeks to cut the number of deaths on the road involving teenagers, it was reported.

http://www.huffingto...l?utm_hp_ref=uk

Seems it is only OK to injure or kill your family members.

Here is one reason why these laws might be brought in!



#2 blueb

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 09:17 AM

They must sit in darkened rooms and think ideas and never consider the effects.
How could or would it be enforced
When does a driver cease to be a 'young' driver?
The Government is promoting apprentices - oops they can't drive the company vehicle/s as they are not family.
Anyone who sees how young drivers get to college or day release - usually they share a car -oops that's a no-no
Anyone been out to an evening function/event and been served by a young person - oops, must end early as they can't get home.
So when is a family member not a family member On a mulit-cultural basis, many call their friends 'brother/sister/uncle/aunt etc but are not actually related.
Young police officers would be permanently walking or jafos (Just another flippin operator)

#3 znra251

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Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:26 PM

They must sit in darkened rooms and think ideas and never consider the effects.
How could or would it be enforced
When does a driver cease to be a 'young' driver?
The Government is promoting apprentices - oops they can't drive the company vehicle/s as they are not family.
Anyone who sees how young drivers get to college or day release - usually they share a car -oops that's a no-no
Anyone been out to an evening function/event and been served by a young person - oops, must end early as they can't get home.
So when is a family member not a family member On a mulit-cultural basis, many call their friends 'brother/sister/uncle/aunt etc but are not actually related.
Young police officers would be permanently walking or jafos (Just another flippin operator)


Slightly missing the point. It's not the age of the driver it's their driving experience that this idea focuses on although it is an implicit part of it that this will affect more young people than older people because a lot of people pass their test while young.

Personally I think that some parts of it are a good idea. The idea that people in their first 2 years of driving would not be allowed to carry passengers after a certain time is in my opinion positive. very often young people do stupid things in cars to impress their friends who are with them. This does have real and fatal consequences when they suddenly reaslise that a 1.2l corsa doesn't have the acceleration required to complete their overtake and the oncoming car ends up in a ditch with 2 fatalities.

A number of other places in the world have a similar rule and it is not difficult to enforce, just as driving licences are not difficult to enforce. If you are stopped by the police with someone else in your car after xpm you'll be sent to court.

Young people are not per se a danger to other road users and many (the majority) are safe drivers who just need a bit more experience. Some are a menace and not enough is done to tackle them. With the far reaching government cut backs the limited amount of traffic enforcement will continue to decline. They will be free to do donuts all night long in the car park. the most that will happen is a s59 warning. No one will be prosecuted and revoked for totting up 6 points in 2 years.

People (the young included) fail to realise that driving is a privilege not a right. You are driving 1/2 ton+ of metal at 30-70mph towards people and if you can't do it responsibly you shouldn't be allowed to.

However this suggestion is just part of a wholesale change which is needed to change driver attitudes and training. We currently train people to pass a test on a fixed set of routes doing a fixed set of manouvers. this doesn't train them to drive just like learning the multiplication tables doesnt teach you maths.

#4 Ernest Marsh civilian

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 02:19 AM

My son has been driving for two years with no accidents.
He is sensible and not prone to hooning about with mates or driving aimlessly around into the wee small hours.

IF he goes out with friends in the car, it is because he is simply transporting them from A to B.

If you are serious about improving driving standards in novice drivers, then adopt a few more of the PROVEN methods used in this country and abroad, instead of allowing councils and pressure groups to wreck the process.

Motorcycles can only be ridden in stages, limited by engine performance and the degree of rider training.
DO THIS FOR CARS TOO!!!
In France and Germany they train longer - and in France you are not allowed on the road until you are 18 - and theiur training and driving test are more lengthy than ours.

PassPlus earns a discount with some insurers - but only for a year. Make it compulsory, and make the INSCOS keep the discount in place!

Finally YOUNG drivers tend to drive what they can afford to insure - but these are very often older or smaller vehicles where the protection or safety features offered are less.
Why not level the premiums for all drivers, but raise the excess for those drivers who are a bigger risk, or hand back the high premiums in the form of bonuses for drivers who don't crash?

#5 blueb

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 08:40 AM

Slightly missing the point. It's not the age of the driver it's their driving experience that this idea focuses on although it is an implicit part of it that this will affect more young people than older people because a lot of people pass their test while young.

Personally I think that some parts of it are a good idea. The idea that people in their first 2 years of driving would not be allowed to carry passengers after a certain time is in my opinion positive. very often young people do stupid things in cars to impress their friends who are with them. This does have real and fatal consequences when they suddenly reaslise that a 1.2l corsa doesn't have the acceleration required to complete their overtake and the oncoming car ends up in a ditch with 2 fatalities.

A number of other places in the world have a similar rule and it is not difficult to enforce, just as driving licences are not difficult to enforce. If you are stopped by the police with someone else in your car after xpm you'll be sent to court.

Young people are not per se a danger to other road users and many (the majority) are safe drivers who just need a bit more experience. Some are a menace and not enough is done to tackle them. With the far reaching government cut backs the limited amount of traffic enforcement will continue to decline. They will be free to do donuts all night long in the car park. the most that will happen is a s59 warning. No one will be prosecuted and revoked for totting up 6 points in 2 years.

People (the young included) fail to realise that driving is a privilege not a right. You are driving 1/2 ton+ of metal at 30-70mph towards people and if you can't do it responsibly you shouldn't be allowed to.

However this suggestion is just part of a wholesale change which is needed to change driver attitudes and training. We currently train people to pass a test on a fixed set of routes doing a fixed set of manouvers. this doesn't train them to drive just like learning the multiplication tables doesnt teach you maths.

Not doubting that some young and/or inexperienced drivers are naughty and have tragic consequences. But the consequences are the important aspect. Perhaps and it is just a perhaps, the late night jollies happen because drivers realise the chances of them being seen, stopped or spoken to are so remote that there is no risk of being caught.
There have been numerous comments on forums over time where potential applicants had completed uni and as yet had not passed their driving test or passed and not driven for various reasons are probably quite as well a few officers who may have the age advantage and still yet to get the driving experience . Applying the idea only to 'young/inexperienced' police officers being a fine example of the effect - no doubling up to share driving, no night shift driving, no late shifts (may result in driving after curfew) no ferrying of colleagues, witnesses, prisoners etc.
Proportionality is an important factor in any legislation which goes well with the 4Es of road safety - education, engineering, example and enforcement - ideally in that order.

#6 Moxnil

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 05:00 PM

Another example of the state treating everyone like kids. Given the extremes they go to, I wouldn't be surprised if they next suggest that everyone has their hands chopped off at birth, because this would statistically lower the amount of road accidents as people couldn't drive.

Edited by Moxnil, 22 November 2012 - 07:09 PM.


#7 DEANO3528

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 01:41 AM

And yet no mention of those drivers that drive everywhere at 45mph regardless of the actual speed limit.

Yes the kids are prone to screwing up due to inexperience but the latest collision I wirnessed was by a woman taking her kid to school. Car iced up and snowed over a couple of weeks back, and with a letterbox aperture on the front scren and her drivers window open she backed out of her drive into a van parked on the opposite side of the road, smashing her o/s rear light. She got out, picked up the bits of lens and drove away, mounthing a 'sorry' to me. This was a bare couple of minutes after an old boy in a Transit pulled out from the kerb right in front of me, on an icy surface.

I'm sorry but despite the statistics, there are far worse 'experienced' drivers in good old Suffolk than the youngsters.






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