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Why don`t you catch REAL criminals?


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#1 kenworthy

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 01:18 PM

I have to date never heard this comment (Why don`t you catch REAL criminals? ) spoken to a Officer, I have heard it rumored that people say it. As the Officer said, he is doing his job! 

 

So angry, so very angry!  :furious3:  :furious3:  :furious3:

 

Brought a smile to my face!

 



#2 SimonT

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:21 PM

we get it all the time, along with ' I pay your wages' ' I bet you were bullied at school' 

we usually chant the others when the first one comes out

plenty of replies if you can be bothered.

 

like ' what job do you do' which often ends the pay wages argument.

 

I will go and get the murderers, I'm just warming up on you.

 

' I bet you were bullied at school' - ' yep'



#3 Sectioned Detection

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:27 PM

When dealing with convicted murderers they say "you should be out catching rapist"

Then speak to a rapist who tells me to catch murderers!

#4 gripper

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:27 PM

Yea, I love it when they say that, normally means they are hiding somthing, or i'm reclaiming their car.

Makes a great job worthwhile, :tongue:



#5 Moxnil

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 05:43 PM

Yea, I love it when they say that, normally means they are hiding somthing, or i'm reclaiming their car.

Makes a great job worthwhile, :tongue:

 


Haha!



#6 intheblitz

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 11:02 PM

Speaking to his daughter like that?
The man really is a grade A a'hole.

Personally I'd like to see him sect 5. If he spoke to a Policeman the way he spoke to his daughter he'd have been cuffed quicker than you can dial 999.

#7 angie101

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 11:21 PM

I thought the PO handled that situation professionally.

Why wouldn't you want to use you seatbelt its for your own safety ? :huh:


Edited by angie101, 27 January 2013 - 11:24 PM.


#8 stewie_griffin

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:58 AM

A warning to anyone from the UK who might get stopped while driving on holiday in North America: don't get out of your car and walk towards the police ... you might end up claiming on your travel insurance.



#9 onthesquare28

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:05 PM

The driver behaved like an idiot on several counts:

 

1. By not wearing his seatbelt;

2. By whining at a PO about his fence panels being vandalised/stolen, when he hasn't reported it;

3. By driving at all when he is in such a obviously stressed and agitated state of mind.

 

It does annoy me when I see irresponsible drivers - people using mobile phones whilst driving particularly irks me. However....

 

..the problem is, when no harm is done (notwithstanding the "might have/could have"), people (OPs) get upset when they are punished, even if it is supposed to be for their "own good".

 

I appeciate that POs are only there to enforce the law, and don't make it, but those having it enforced upon them are most unlikely to come face to face with those who draft it and pass it into statute. Hence, POs, will have to bear the brunt of the upset at "the point of delivery".

 

If you are a PO, how would you expect the driver to behave at being issued with a fine? If he was sangune about it, then the likelihhod is that it's probably not going to have the intended effect?



#10 cheesedoff

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:24 PM

What i expect, and got the vast majority of the time, is for the offender to accept that they have broken the law for no good reason and have been caught, and the Officer has a job to do. IE. casualty reduction.



#11 onthesquare28

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:47 PM

What i expect, and got the vast majority of the time, is for the offender to accept that they have broken the law for no good reason and have been caught, and the Officer has a job to do. IE. casualty reduction.

 

And, the vast majority of the time, do you get what you expect? Or do you, more often than not, get an undesired reaction?



And, the vast majority of the time, do you get what you expect? Or do you, more often than not, get an undesired reaction?

 

Sorry - just realised you said "and got"



#12 cheesedoff

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:49 PM

I got what i expected the vast majority of the time. The ones that run their mouth off where only every now and again to be fair



#13 onthesquare28

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:52 PM

What i expect, and got the vast majority of the time, is for the offender to accept that they have broken the law for no good reason and have been caught, and the Officer has a job to do. IE. casualty reduction.

 

The driver, here, though, has accepted that he has broken the law, has he not? He has apologised for not wearing his seatbelt when he should have been doing. He only became really upset when he realised he was going to be punished.



#14 cheesedoff

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 09:01 PM

He didn't accept that the officer had a job to do though did he?



#15 onthesquare28

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 09:40 PM

He didn't accept that the officer had a job to do though did he?

 

I guess that's a point up for discussion - he apologised numerous times - one could imply that he understands such an acceptance. I wonder what would have happened had the PO said that failing to wear a seatbelt was an offence, but would not fine him on this occasion, but warned him that he could impose a £60 fine etc etc



#16 intheblitz

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:46 PM

I guess that's a point up for discussion - he apologised numerous times - one could imply that he understands such an acceptance. I wonder what would have happened had the PO said that failing to wear a seatbelt was an offence, but would not fine him on this occasion, but warned him that he could impose a £60 fine etc etc

My guess is he'd have driven away and not given a toss, continued with his argument, bad attitude etc and when he drove the next day, or the day after, the seatbelt would have been happily position tight up against the B pillar, where it was when the PC caught him. I bet though, after his £60 fine, he "clunk click's every trip!"  :wink:



#17 stewie_griffin

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 10:48 PM

I'm not sure what onthesquare's point is here. Are you saying police officers shouldn't give tickets for offences like this or not? Remember, the police officer's not the judge here taking the sixty quid off the driver, the driver still has the option to contest the fine if he wishes.



#18 intheblitz

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:09 PM

I'm not sure what onthesquare's point is here. Are you saying police officers shouldn't give tickets for offences like this or not? Remember, the police officer's not the judge here taking the sixty quid off the driver, the driver still has the option to contest the fine if he wishes.

Only if he wanted to increase the fine and get costs against him. He'd admitted his guilt and wasn't questioning that. He wanted "words of advice" but got an FPN for his trouble. I have to say, words of advice seem thin on the ground from what little I've seen lately. FPN's seem the norm of the day. It does feel, to a certain extent (and I'm only surmising here) that procedures/attitudes have changed a lot in the last few years. It's not so much about how the public perceive the Police, but how much provable work you can do in a shift and 6 FPN's prove you've done a lot more work than half a dozen "words of advice".



#19 gripper

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:25 PM

Yep, every bit of work I do, is recorded on a daily work return. There is no "words of advice" box!. With the possibility of getting made redundant, I have to make sure, I am good value for money'.

#20 intheblitz

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 11:45 PM

But why is there no "words of advice" box. IMHO it is/was one of the most important parts of the job. It kept the public on side but if a Copper was worth his salt, those words would stay with the errant motorist, anti social teenager, etc for many days/weeks to come. We certainly seem to be getting the Police we deserve.  :sad:


Edited by intheblitz, 28 January 2013 - 11:46 PM.





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