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Good idea? Your thoughts!


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#1 kenworthy

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Posted 17 February 2013 - 12:24 PM

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21483160

 

 

A new system means parents can retain some control when they hand their car keys to their teenager for the first time.

It can limit their children's speed and even stop them having the stereo too loud when they borrow the car.

BBC Transport Correspondent Richard Westcott reports.

 

Video of this on the site! 

 

Seems a blinding idea to me!



#2 tjp

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 06:46 PM

I think it's terrible - the reason that we young drivers make poor decisions is that we're inexperienced at making driving decisions.
If someone else makes them, then you're not learning anything, and you're not getting any safer, are you?

 

tjp



#3 Frank Drebin

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 07:50 PM

I think it's terrible - the reason that we young drivers make poor decisions is that we're inexperienced at making driving decisions.
If someone else makes them, then you're not learning anything, and you're not getting any safer, are you?

 

tjp

 

Young drivers are inexperienced, that is true, yes. But, for example, would you rather learn that you are going too fast by a limiter kicking in, or by crashing?



#4 Bynti

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 09:12 AM

I think it's terrible - the reason that we young drivers make poor decisions is that we're inexperienced at making driving decisions.
If someone else makes them, then you're not learning anything, and you're not getting any safer, are you?

 

tjp

 

In most situations I would tend to agree with you  tjp, and I can understand how it may seem a bit "nannish", however I would rather see ideas like this 

than an RTA or fatality. It dosent have to be used forever just while people are finding their feet.



#5 Ernest Marsh civilian

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 01:22 PM

Best form of protection for your children is some quality parenting (and vetting of internet access, phone use, and friends)!

 

When my eldest was just a toddler, he started to tear up a free newspaper at my mothers.

I told him to stop - but she simply said "It doesn't matter, it is free and unwanted"

To which I replied "When he can tell the difference between a free newspaper and a family bible, he can tear it up - until then he will be told NO."

 

Putting electronics in the car is no substitute for taking the time to teach the things that are important, even if it means going on private land and letting them scare themselves in safety with you in the vehicle.

 

Anything else, and you are simply postponing the time when they try it for themselves at the wrong time or wrong place.



#6 blueb

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Posted 20 February 2013 - 05:31 PM

Put ina limiter and some will simply drive at the point the limiter cuts in, and make the often irrational decision that as they are travelling at the limited speed it must be safe. As for loud music etc - how do you or I decide what is loud, often it is the content involved rather than the volume.
For each positive there can be a negative - it is not a cure for all but may suit some. Making it available rather than compulsory is quite acceptable - making it compulsory would be utter madness and impossible to enforce.

#7 Jon.

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Posted 21 February 2013 - 09:49 PM

It's not always speed that results in a young/inexperienced driver crashing. Observation skills come with experience and give the ability to plan ahead and anticipate events.

Restricting the speed will not prevent all accidents but it will mean that they happen at a lower speed so reducing injury/fatalities.

This has got to be a good thing.

Perhaps it could be introduced to run alongside the 2yr 'probation' for the driving licence.



#8 Ernest Marsh civilian

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 01:08 PM

It's not always speed that results in a young/inexperienced driver crashing. Observation skills come with experience and give the ability to plan ahead and anticipate events.

Restricting the speed will not prevent all accidents but it will mean that they happen at a lower speed so reducing injury/fatalities.

This has got to be a good thing.

Perhaps it could be introduced to run alongside the 2yr 'probation' for the driving licence.

BUT, if you limit their speed with a limiter, they will continue to remain inexperienced where speed is concerned, and if youthful, frustrated at a restriction to their driving desires.

When the limiter is finally removed, it could be worse than letting them gain valuable experience in a safer environment.

 

Education is the key, coupled with facilities where they can hone their skills in safety, and in vehicles that have the best safety features, not just those that a novice driver is able to afford.



#9 monnty

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 04:16 PM

limiting the speed and roads that new drivers used is not denying them the opportunity of learning. You don't throw a child in the deep end the moment they loose the arm bands, They develop skill, stamina and experience before venturing into the depths that are literally over their head. Why let a child loose on a road with seemingly limitless power to an over confident incompetent novice? Ease them in and they gain skills, make mistakes and realize they are not as good as they thought they were. 

 

saves us telling them that they are so bad they have to take a test again or worse we tell the family they were so bad they're either off to jail or the morgue.  



#10 Ernest Marsh civilian

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 10:09 PM

limiting the speed and roads that new drivers used is not denying them the opportunity of learning. You don't throw a child in the deep end the moment they loose the arm bands, They develop skill, stamina and experience before venturing into the depths that are literally over their head. Why let a child loose on a road with seemingly limitless power to an over confident incompetent novice? Ease them in and they gain skills, make mistakes and realize they are not as good as they thought they were. 

 

saves us telling them that they are so bad they have to take a test again or worse we tell the family they were so bad they're either off to jail or the morgue.  

I don't disagree with what you say, but the discussion related to a speed limiter device.

If you limit the speed with a  such a device, then there is no option to increase speeds when appropriate to gain experience.

 

With arm bands, you can deflate them gradually as the child increases in confidence.

In driving, it needs a gradual increase in experience - confidence (although misplaced) is usually plentiful.



#11 tjp

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Posted 27 February 2013 - 11:39 PM

I'd argue that it's precisely because we (as in young drivers) are so poor at making decisions that we shouldn't have speed limiters.

Who here can honestly say that they've never misjudged an overtake slightly, and had to accellerate their way out of it?
I have - it was absolutely terrifying; I was a new driver, I thought I had space to overtake, and I didn't. If the car had decided I couldn't go faster than 60mph, then I'd've been squished. It was completely my fault, and it taught me to judge speed better. I'm glad I had the speed to get out of it though...

 

tjp



#12 Justmyopinion

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Posted 28 February 2013 - 11:35 AM

Any views on the approach in NI?  New drivers are red R Plated for 12 months these mean you are restricted to 45mph.  Obviously a bit of an issue on the motorway but could have a 60 mph and nearside 2 lanes only restriction applied in England, wales and Scotland?






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