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  2. Any advice on a specific area of law is from either currently-serving UK police officers, and is offered to the best of their ability, or from members of the public who are perhaps aspiring to be serving police officers and may not hold the necessary level of knowledge to provide such assistance or by any other member who may offer their opinion. Either way such advice can only be treated as an opinion and nothing more. Members should look for the Verified Members Badge that appears on the posters name as advice from members holding this badge are verified police employees. The information is based on their own individual experiences, expertise and training. It is stressed, however, that if any information or advice found in these forums is used by any person or organisation, then the respective police officer(s) and staff can not and will not take any responsibility for any outcome in any investigation in a criminal or civil enquiry. Any advice or opinion offered is to the best of the individuals knowledge and ability based on the information you have supplied, and we will stress that we will never be knowingly misleading or untruthful in content. [*]Please note, we do not offer advice or assistance in order to avoid penalties that you have incurred or maybe pending. [*]Such requests are deemed to be of an Operational nature and against our main Forum Rules. [*]You should always seek Legal Advice from a Qualified Solicitor in the event of any impending prosecutions or other involved legal matter. Administration Team UKPoliceOnline
  3. Today
  4. this is a long and complex case where the police have failed numerous times over the past 2 years. IOPC is currently investigating and i will talk with them next week so i am looking for advice on police procedure i could mention. last summer my eldest daughter was assaulted and it resulted in a head injury. the police took photos and interviewed her. after 2 months of doing nothing the perpetrator took the victim out of the country. the 6 months investigation limit ended and they dropped the case. 2 years ago my youngest who was 2 at the time was violently knocked unconscious by the same perpetrator. the perp lied to the police about her suffering from a "medical condition of dizziness". i have a letter from her doctor that says she is perfectly healthy. my older daughter witnessed the event and described to CAFCASS as being "very violent" habitual slaps to the face of the eldest resulted in permanent hearing loss in 1 ear. my daughter also told cafcass about this and around 1 month later her fears were confirmed in a routine school hearing test. the same perp held a knife to my face in a threatening manor. the perp admitts it happened has told numerous wildly varying lies, all on paper, about what actually happened. I have also recently received a thinly veiled death threat by email. there have been at least 4 times the children have told the police about violence. the criminal and victims are now in another country in the EU and i cannot seem to make the police there take it seriously. there are many more violent incidents but that gives a general picture. is there anything i can point out in police procedure to bring the criminal to justice? thank you
  5. Yesterday
  6. i have used body cams for about 6 years, from pubs to football events. on a jacket i had, i had a smile your on cctv and being recorded and seem to stop close to 80% of trouble.
  7. Applied for Hampshire

    So, has anyone else received the email from Hants Constabulary recruitment team regarding further delays to our applications to join as a PC? It's been 19 months since my initial application. I'll bet my house that if they'd said at the start it would be 2years+ until you'll get a job offer a lot wouldn't have bothered! I'm a patient person but this is bordering the ridiculous, who holds these recruitment people to account? Is is a case of "get as many through the door as we can" because they get money for each one? Rant over.
  8. Any advice on a specific area of law is from either currently-serving UK police officers, and is offered to the best of their ability, or from members of the public who are perhaps aspiring to be serving police officers and may not hold the necessary level of knowledge to provide such assistance or by any other member who may offer their opinion. Either way such advice can only be treated as an opinion and nothing more. Members should look for the Verified Members Badge that appears on the posters name as advice from members holding this badge are verified police employees. The information is based on their own individual experiences, expertise and training. It is stressed, however, that if any information or advice found in these forums is used by any person or organisation, then the respective police officer(s) and staff can not and will not take any responsibility for any outcome in any investigation in a criminal or civil enquiry. Any advice or opinion offered is to the best of the individuals knowledge and ability based on the information you have supplied, and we will stress that we will never be knowingly misleading or untruthful in content. [*]Please note, we do not offer advice or assistance in order to avoid penalties that you have incurred or maybe pending. [*]Such requests are deemed to be of an Operational nature and against our main Forum Rules. [*]You should always seek Legal Advice from a Qualified Solicitor in the event of any impending prosecutions or other involved legal matter. Administration Team UKPoliceOnline
  9. i have passed the level 2 handcuff training courses and have 2 pairs of cuffs. I have also used them 3 times in 3 years on the doors of clubs. What i want to know, if you are being arrested a lot, do you think yourself "smart" on using a key to get out of them? you would more than likely be done for Resisting Arrest and also something like escaping police custody.
  10. i would check with MOT people first as i know some front bars are banned.
  11. As a DS sia badge holder for 8 years (security for 20) and now a CCTV holder, i have been kicking the idea about of making a CCTV van for events as a way to make myself more money. I have seen at lease 6 companies in the UK who have vans and hire them out for events, campsites and half a dozen other reasons and seems a niche to get into. I wanted to know (why i joined here) on any legal information that is about for this. I know from just doing the CCTV training last year about the data side and should display a number / who is running the data in case anyone wants to view it. But the main things i want to know are: If i was to add a camera for ANPR (hikvision make one) for campsites or alike, what sort of legal cover do i need for this? It maybe only used to track plates going in and out of a area and not the data of owner ect needed. As i have a public space CCTV badge, am I right in saying only CCTV badge holders can use the system? As many people, even my trainer said you don't have to have a badge for mobile CCTV vans and only do if in a fixed building and control room. There maybe more to add, but this is the stating points. thanks for any replies and feedback
  12. hi all

    south east UK guy. Been a doorman and secuirty on and off for 20 years. Hold both ds and cctv badges and joined here for some feedback on some areas of questions i want to get answered
  13. Last week
  14. A friend who lives in Scotland is in dispute with a tradesman who carried out work on his house. He asked me for help, but I am not sure myself... He would like to find out if he can secretly (and legally): - Audio record the tradesman when he visits his house to discuss the problems. The intention is to potentially collect evidence that may be useful if the dispute ends up in court. - Audio record another tradesman that he intends to invite to his house to inspect and comment on the quality of the work. He was unable to find any tradesman that was prepared to comment on the quality of the work on record. Paying a surveyor to produce a report would be too expensive for him. Again, his intention is to potentially use the recording in court. Both recordings will take place in his house, and without the knowledge of the other party. His questions are: 1. Is it legal to audio record someone in your house without their permission? 2. Will the recordings be admissible in co
  15. Police Scotland Recruitment

    13 weeks for me too through L division (Argyll)
  16. Police Scotland Recruitment

    WHich area did you go through?
  17. Police Scotland Recruitment

    13 weeks for me.
  18. Anti-depressants: Major study finds they work By Alex Therrien Health reporter, BBC News 22 February 2018 Image copyright Getty Images Scientists say they have settled one of medicine's biggest debates after a huge study found that anti-depressants work. The study, which analysed data from 522 trials involving 116,477 people, found 21 common anti-depressants were all more effective at reducing symptoms of acute depression than dummy pills. But it also showed big differences in how effective each drug is. The authors of the report, published in the Lancet, said it showed many more people could benefit from the drugs. There were 64.7 million prescriptions for the drugs in England in 2016 - more than double the 31 million in 2006 - but there has been a debate about how effective they are, with some trial suggesting they are no better than placebos. The Royal College of Psychiatrists said the study "finally puts to bed the controversy on anti-depressants". The so-called meta-analysis, which involved unpublished data in addition to the information from the 522 clinical trials involving the short-term treatment of acute depression in adults, found the medications were all more effective than placebos. However, the study found they ranged from being a third more effective than a placebo to more than twice as effective. Lead researcher Dr Andrea Cipriani, from the University of Oxford, told the BBC: "This study is the final answer to a long-standing controversy about whether anti-depressants work for depression. "We found the most commonly prescribed anti-depressants work for moderate to severe depression and I think this is very good news for patients and clinicians." Anti-depressants - the most and least effective Image copyright Getty Images The most effective: agomelatine amitriptyline escitalopram mirtazapine paroxetine The least effective: fluoxetine fluvoxamine reboxetine trazodone 'Compelling evidence' The study's authors said the findings could help doctors to pick the right prescription, but it did not mean everyone should be switching medications. That is because the study looked at the average effect of drugs rather than how they worked for individuals of different ages or gender, the severity of symptoms and other characteristics. Researchers added that most of the data in the meta-analysis covered eight weeks of treatment, so the findings might not apply to longer-term use. And they said it did not mean that anti-depressants should always be the first form of treatment. At least one million more people in the UK would benefit from treatments, including anti-depressants, they said. "Medication should always be considered alongside other options, such as psychological therapies, where these are available," Dr Cipriani added. You might also be interested in: Soaring rates of measles in Europe The dirtiest place in your kitchen might surprise you Jamie Oliver closes flagship restaurant Prof Carmine Pariante, from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, said: "This meta-analysis finally puts to bed the controversy on anti-depressants, clearly showing that these drugs do work in lifting mood and helping most people with depression. "Importantly, the paper analyses unpublished data held by pharmaceutical companies, and shows that the funding of studies by these companies does not influence the result, thus confirming that the clinical usefulness of these drugs is not affected by pharma-sponsored spin." Glyn Lewis, professor of psychiatric epidemiology at University College London, said the "excellent" study provided "compelling evidence" for the effectiveness of anti-depressants. He added: "Anti-depressants often receive a 'bad press' but this paper shows they have a role in the management for people with depression." View the full article
  19. Police Scotland Recruitment

    I applied last month and was notified that my application went straight to vetting due to a disclosure I made about a family member. Does anyone know roughly how long this will take? I’ve been waiting 4 weeks now.
  20. Oxfam boss Mark Goldring 'sorry' over Haiti scandal 20 February 2018 Related TopicsOxfam Haiti scandal Image caption Mark Goldring has been at Oxfam since 2013 Oxfam's chief executive Mark Goldring has said he is sorry for the damage the charity has done to the people of Haiti and the wider efforts of aid workers. He is facing questions from MPs on the International Development Committee about the sexual misconduct of some staff after the 2010 Haiti earthquake. In 10 days, 7,000 people have cancelled regular donations, MPs were told. Mr Goldring also apologised for remarks made about murdering babies in cots which he made in defending Oxfam. In an interview with the Guardian last week, he said: "The intensity and ferocity of the attack makes you wonder, what did we do? We murdered babies in their cots?" Mr Goldring, who joined the charity in 2013, said he was "deeply sorry" for the comments that he had made while "under stress". LIVE: MPs question charity bosses How the Oxfam scandal unfolded Earlier this month, the Times newspaper published allegations that Oxfam aid workers in Haiti had used prostitutes. Oxfam, which has almost 10,000 staff working in more than 90 countries, denied a cover-up but its handling of the scandal is being investigated by the Charity Commission. Since the story broke, Mr Goldring said 26 reports of recent and historic incidents have been made by Oxfam workers - 16 of them outside the UK. Of the scandal, he said: "I am sorry, we are sorry, for the damage Oxfam has done both to the people of Haiti but also to wider efforts for aid and development by possibly undermining public support." Image copyright AFP Image caption Winnie Byanyima said she was ashamed by what happened in Haiti Caroline Thomson, the chair of trustees, and Winnie Byanyima, executive director of Oxfam International, both told the committee they were "ashamed" of what happened in Haiti. Ms Byanyima said she has spent her life protecting women. "This is painful for me," she added. Ms Thomson, who became chairwoman of Oxfam's trustees in 2017, said the charity council's task was to ensure it is "never again" at risk of being perceived to have put reputation over accountability. Mr Goldring said there was now a safeguarding team and helpline at Oxfam and the charity was seeking more independent support. Committee chairman Stephen Twigg said his committee would conduct a full inquiry into sexual misconduct in the aid sector in the wake of the scandal. 'Bullying and intimidation' A redacted version of an internal report from 2011, released on Monday, revealed that three of the men accused of sexual misconduct in Haiti physically threatened witnesses during an investigation. It also showed: One Oxfam employee was dismissed and three resigned for using prostitutes on Oxfam premises. The use of underage prostitutes was not ruled out Two more were dismissed for bullying and intimidation - one of whom also downloaded pornography Another man was sacked for failing to protect staff During the committee hearing, it emerged that one of them was re-employed for Oxfam on a short-term contract in another country. Image copyright VRT Image caption Mr Van Hauwermeiren worked in Chad from 2006-09 before going to Haiti in 2010 In the report, the charity said director of operations in Haiti, Roland Van Hauwermeiren, "admitted using prostitutes" at his Oxfam residence. Last week, he denied paying prostitutes for sex. He was granted a "phased and dignified exit" and was allowed to resign, the report added, so long as he fully co-operated with the rest of the 2011 investigation. It is not known if he was one of the suspects accused of threatening witnesses. The BBC has discovered that one of the staff dismissed from Oxfam for gross misconduct in Haiti was Raphael Mutiku, a Kenyan aid worker based outside the capital Nairobi. Asked by a reporter whether he had been with Mr Van Hauwermeiren, Mr Mutiku said "no". As he got into a vehicle, he was asked why he had been let go by Oxfam but not did not answer. 'Smorgasbord of women' A source, who was aware of the investigation and was in Haiti at the time, told the BBC that drivers were forced to deliver prostitutes to Oxfam villas. "They were having parties over there that were described as orgies with a smorgasbord of women, girls, wearing Oxfam T-shirts. It would go on all night. "We were told they were underage. The security guards, the drivers were talking about it not directly - indirectly - because if they talked to anyone about it they would lose their jobs." Oxfam UK boss: Attacks 'out of proportion' How much UK money goes to Oxfam? 'Sex between locals and employees' UN aid agencies fear Oxfam backlash The report called for tighter safeguarding across the industry to stop disgraced aid workers moving to new posts. Despite the warning, several of those implicated subsequently worked for other aid organisations, or moved to other posts within Oxfam. In the wake of the revelations, MPs on the international development committee convened an urgent session to investigate the crisis. BBC diplomatic correspondent James Landale said the focus was likely to be on Mark Goldring's leadership, as a number of people, including former international development minister Priti Patel, have called for him to resign. MPs are also expected to ask Save the Children's chief Kevin Watkins about his charity's response to the issues raised. DfID's permanent secretary Matthew Rycroft will tell the committee about the department's knowledge of the situation. Get news from the BBC in your inbox, each weekday morning Oxfam has said it released the internal report because it wanted to be "as transparent as possible" about decisions made. On Monday, Oxfam regional director for Latin America Simon Ticehurst presented the original, unedited report to the government in Haiti and formally apologised. He said the charity would be starting "the long road ahead of re-establishing trust and partnership" with Haiti and was ready to engage with Haitian people and co-operate with their government. Oxfam has said it will set up a commission to investigate past and present allegations of exploitation by staff. Its deputy chief executive, Penny Lawrence, resigned earlier this month over the handling of the scandal, saying she took full responsibility. Meanwhile, ministers have said Oxfam has agreed to stop bidding for UK government funding until it can show it meets the "high standards" required. Do you have any information related to this story that you wish to share? Please email haveyoursay@bbc.co.uk. Please include a contact number if you are willing to speak to a BBC journalist. You can also contact us in the following ways: WhatsApp: +447555 173285 Tweet: @BBC_HaveYourSay Send an SMS or MMS to 61124 or +44 7624 800 100 Or comment here: Your contact details Name (optional) Your E-mail address (required) Town & Country (optional) Your telephone number (optional) Comments (required) If you are happy to be contacted by a BBC journalist please leave a telephone number that we can contact you on. In some cases a selection of your comments will be published, displaying your name as you provide it and location, unless you state otherwise. Your contact details will never be published. When sending us pictures, video or eyewitness accounts at no time should you endanger yourself or others, take any unnecessary risks or infringe any laws. Please ensure you have read the terms and conditions. Terms and conditions View the full article
  21. Any rejoiners out there?

    Unfortunate personal circumstances, and it was always my intention to return once that was done with.
  22. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Cheers for that, that will help alot. Ive heard alot about good cop / bad cop interviews but i believe that is how they find the best candidates. You wouldnt make a good police officer if you couldnt handle someone challenging you face to face. Well done on getting through the process. Hope the wait hasn’t been too painfull! Good Luck with you’re new career :)
  23. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Yeah they tell you which one they are asking for. I was also asked if I knew any of the specialist units and the operational units. They didn't want me to know everything and once I had named a few of them they were happy and moved on. Don't be scared to ask them to repeat the question and don't be scared to stop half way through an answer if it's not fitting their question and ask them if you can start again with a different example. I along with a few others had a good cop bad cop type interview. Don't be flustered by it. I was cut off mid sentence, questioned why I would leave a job to join the police at 37 and he kept looking at his watch when I was talking. He did the same to the others he interviewed too so just keep calm. Good luck
  24. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Thanks for the advice, I will follow that and hopefully it all goes well. Do the interviewers tell you the competencey they are asking about before they ask the question? Or have I picked that up wrong from a previous post?
  25. Police Scotland Recruitment

    All I can say is just be yourself and relax! Take a drink when you need to, this helps you figure out what it is you want to say. They want you to do well so as long as you know your examples you can fit them into the question being asked, then you'll be fine! Smash it pal :)
  26. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Thanks for the reply everyone. Helps alot. Think I am just overthinking things and imagining the worst. Any other advice on initial interview? Two weeks and counting!
  27. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Hello, Sorry I just looked at my form and you’re right, because mine was a missed credit card that’s why I added it on. On the form the question is, ‘Have you any debt/joint debt at present, for example, mortgage, loans, store cards or credit cards? Or any credit agreements, for example, car finance?’ I didn’t put any household bills. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  28. Police Scotland Recruitment

    Morning folks. At my initial interview they went over any phone contracts etc I may of had before I went into my interview. They should go over it all with you just to double check.
  29. Police Scotland Recruitment

    The vetting part of the application does not ask for any household bills. Just any loans, credit cards, car finance ect. or have I missed something.
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