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helen66

Some lock picking tools using laws

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Can anyone explain some laws of using lock picking tools in the UK? I want to learn about the laws.

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Didn't know there was any specific laws about using lock picking tools.

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The laws will revolve around - Going Equipped Offence -

Ie - A genuine Locksmith would have lawful permission / consent to gain entry to a property Eg - Owner loses keys and calls locksmith out to gain entry to own property by what means the Locksmith deans suitable / least damaging

Billy Burglar out at any time of day with same tools would have a lot of explaining to do

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Billy Burglar out at any time of day with same tools would have a lot of explaining to do

Isn't Billy Burglar more likely to use a crow bar than lock picks? It takes a lot of practise/skill to use lock picks, I doubt that the common burglar would actually go that route???

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quite true, but if your not a locksmith and are found to have them you are probably coming in

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I am interested to hear what the law is on this.

I used to work for a large hotel chain, and was once nominated for a guest care award because I opened a jewel case after the guest had come away without the key.

I have also rescued a few motorists who had locked their keys inside their cars - but am not a professional!

If I had a lock pick, could I argue that I had a justifiable use for it, and had never used it to commit a crime?

There are of course other materials that would aid a thief which might be found about my person - because I use them in my work, and have on occasions forgotten to empty my pockets before I leave for home!

I am thinking along the lines of a strip cut from the side of a 2 litre Coke bottle... better than a credit card, and used to scrape paint into engravings!!

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It's all about context - if you have a lock pick and it's 3am near a dark garage, you will struggle. If it's whilst at work you may have a lawful explanation.

I think you may still get suspected, but it is like most other aspects of law - if you are using it lawfully, then you have no issues. You just have to expect that dependant on the context an officer might reasonably want to do some investigating to ensure your account is true and honest. An honest person with no history of theft carrying an object that he can account for by his work and in non-suspicious circumstances shouldn't have anything to worry about!! The same object carried by a serial burglar with no obvious excuse and in a place where they cannot easily account for their presence will be treated very differently.

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The laws will revolve around - Going Equipped Offence -

Ie - A genuine Locksmith would have lawful permission / consent to gain entry to a property Eg - Owner loses keys and calls locksmith out to gain entry to own property by what means the Locksmith deans suitable / least damaging

Billy Burglar out at any time of day with same tools would have a lot of explaining to do

Thanks for sharing your views and suggestion. I am still interested all UK laws about lock picking.

It's all about context - if you have a lock pick and it's 3am near a dark garage, you will struggle. If it's whilst at work you may have a lawful explanation.

I think you may still get suspected, but it is like most other aspects of law - if you are using it lawfully, then you have no issues. You just have to expect that dependant on the context an officer might reasonably want to do some investigating to ensure your account is true and honest. An honest person with no history of theft carrying an object that he can account for by his work and in non-suspicious circumstances shouldn't have anything to worry about!! The same object carried by a serial burglar with no obvious excuse and in a place where they cannot easily account for their presence will be treated very differently.

I want to use lock pick set to prevent any damage .And I also want to use it as a fun but after following my country laws then I shall use it.

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helen66 what country are you in? If its not the UK like I suspect why are you interested in our laws?

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Use a lock picking set as fun? Not sure that would be reasonable excuse!

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Use a lock picking set as fun? Not sure that would be reasonable excuse!

Since there is no legal restriction on purchasing, owning or having fun with lock picks, you don't need a reasonable excuse to have them on you.

It's a little worrying that anybody sees possession of lock picks as grounds for arrest, unless you're a lock smith. I'm not a paramedic, but I have been known to carry aspirin in my pockets...

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Asprin is of little use when committing crime, a lockpick set is and other than being a locksmith there sent many reasons to have one.

Combined with almost any suspicious activity it would be a sure arrest

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It's a little worrying that anybody sees possession of lock picks as grounds for arrest, unless you're a lock smith. I'm not a paramedic, but I have been known to carry aspirin in my pockets...

As stated previously, it is circumstantial but absolutely grounds for arrest. If you're in possession of said items and told me you had them on you 'for fun' that would certainly raise my suspicion and arrest would be a consideration.

If I tried to travel through departures with thousands of pounds and told customs it was just 'spare change' customs would let me carry on unchallenged?

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Going equipped is a catch all charge that could be applied to just about any item. I was discussing carrying a knife in my mountain rescue kit with a friend who is a serving officer and we got on to multitools.

Despite my Leatherman being exempt under Sect 139 of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 (nonlocking folding blade of less than 3"), he would still arrest for going equipped. It may be difficult to prove intent and so not be taken forward by the CPS but the arrest alone could cause problems (CRB checks, entry to USA). Using going equipped as an excuse causes a lack of trust in the Police.

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I'm not sure I can personally reconcile that level of "circumstantial" with "reasonable grounds to suspect".

As far as the cash goes, unlike lock picks, there is a legal restriction on the movement of criminal cash, which allows police and customs to enquire about the source of cash. What we can't do though is arrest someone for money laundering because they are carrying cash and they don't work in a bank.

As for the lock picks, most sets in this country are owned by "amateurs" for a hobby. On the balance of probabilities, "for fun" is going to be the most likely truthful answer. Obviously, with other relevant suspicious activity, you may have grounds for arrest, but the earlier posts suggested you'd be happy to arrest solely for possession.

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