Disable-Adblock.png

We have detected that your browser is using AdBlock

Police Community is a not for profit organisation and advertising revenue is key to our continued viability.

Please disable your AdBlocker on our site in order to continue using it.
This message will disappear once AdBlock has been disabled.

Thank you for your support - we appreciate it !

If you feel you are getting this message in error please email support@policecommunity.co.uk

rogerthepoliceman

Today Is My Last Day In The Job.

Recommended Posts

Today is my last day in the job. Tomorrow is my first day retired. I have chucked it at 50 years old with more than 25 years service. I take a big hit with the commutation, but the monthly pension is fine. I don't care about that, I am just glad to be out.

I phoned in sick two months ago, I saw my GP, gave him a brief run down of events in my career and he signed me off for as long as it took to retire, so I did not have to go back into work. No one from work has been in touch. I have had stuff through about retiring and I will keep on membership of the Federation because they do a good deal on travel/breakdown/home emergency/legal cover.

I sneaked into work a while back one evening when no one was around and sorted my stuff and left my keys and uniform. So today, my last day is at home writing this and going live my blog

https://rogerthepoliceman.wordpress.com/

Read that to understand why I got sick of a job that has regularly behaved in an appalling way towards me. Read about how I was able to prove HR do tamper with personnel files and hide entries. Read about a terrible error by the area control room that only by luck did not result in another death after the terrible M9 tragedy. Read about moral and just how badly management are when it comes to welfare. I have loads more evidence which shows that there are major problems with the way the police are being run and the poor standards of certain police officers.

It is quite something that now, on retiring I am scared of the police and actually cringe when I see a police office or car. I feel panicked and worry that they will single me out and abuse me. None of my family will ever trust the police again.

I still have court to attend, but not like many officers, as I am the accused, Apparently going into a cell and stopping someone from killing them self without causing them any injury is an assault. I cannot discuss that further as I head towards year three since it happened. During the first 19 months I was not even sure of what I had done as I was only told there had been an incident and I was placed on restricted duties.

I want to publicise what has been going on so as to encourage others to come forward and at least share and know there are others and they are not alone. I hope, but doubt very much I may be able to act as a catalyst so that police managers have to accept they keep getting it wrong and they need to change. Management training is the issue. Managers need to to told certain forms of behaviour are unacceptable if they act so, they will be punished.

So there you go, this is what I have been doing in my last day as a police officer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that's quite a negative post. I never really thought I'd read something like that on here.

In the spirit of openness, I will say that the post above was flagged up as being overly negative and that's how my attention was drawn to it. The person that reported it felt that perhaps it was a little too much for a site such as this.

However, on reflection, I've decided that it can, and indeed should stay. This site (and others like it) shouldn't be full of only 'good news', and perhaps others should be aware that sometimes the job can let you down, or at least, not back you up as much as it perhaps should. But do please bear in mind that there are two sides to every story, and only one side is given here.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dragonfly, well done for letting it stay.

Roger, I wish you well in the future and all that holds.

I hear more and more of these retirement messages, across a number of different sites, where officers put papers in to go (Retirement and Early) and the recurring message in most of them is basically "The job doesnt give one anymore. No Thanks, No Goodbye, just There's the door shut it on the way out"

I believe part of this is the Butterfly, remote management culture we now have and not just at senior level.

My Sgt for my annual appraisal this year is located 25 miles from where I work, and other than 3 emails about sorting my PDR I have never met or spoken to him since he was allocated to me in March this year.

Sent from my PLK-L01 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is negative because am afraid that much of what has been done to me over the years has been negative.

I know it is my version of what has happened, but when I found out and proved my personnel file was being tampered with, there is only once version of events. There was an offensive and abusive memo about me and my wife from when we lived in a police house from the then head of property services. Attempts were made to hide it from me by denying a request to see the file and then removing the memo when I requested I was sent a copy, only to then return the memo to my file. That is fact, I can prove it, any other version of what happened would be untrue.

I really appreciate that this thread is being kept. Unless the job faces up to the negative impact it has on certain of its staff, management will not learn from past mistakes and make things better for the future. When a recent survey of police officers and staff in Scotland finds that only 5% of police officers believe management care about welfare, pointing out why that is the case is vital learning.

When you consider that 5% of police officers are senior management and they almost certainly responded that they do care about welfare, that means for PCs and Sgts the result was statistically close to zero percent. Think about what that means. Think about how bad that is. Senior management have achieved an almost impossible result of getting universal agreement from the rank and file that they do not care. That is fact, I can prove it, it is not my version of events. It is the only version of events. The result was only 5%.

This part is my opinion; I believe that a major reason why that almost zero result was achieved is because almost every police officer in Scotland if they have not experienced a lack of care for welfare, knows about one.

Back to the facts. Lots of people knew what happened to me and my family when I was given less than 24 hours notice to transfer from a rural town 138 miles to a new office in a big town in a new division. My wife had to leave her job, my child switch school in term time and I had to borrow money to finance the move. It caused us all sorts of issues. I was refused assistance, more time to complete the move and told to shut up and get on with it. Again, that is all fact, I can prove that happened as described with multiple pieces of documentation and witnesses. It is not just my version of events. It is what happened.

If all of this is too much, sorry. It happened and just as I have said in my blog, if you don't like it, go and read another blog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dragonfly, well done for letting it stay.

Roger, I wish you well in the future and all that holds.

I hear more and more of these retirement messages, across a number of different sites, where officers put papers in to go (Retirement and Early) and the recurring message in most of them is basically "The job doesnt give one anymore. No Thanks, No Goodbye, just There's the door shut it on the way out"

I believe part of this is the Butterfly, remote management culture we now have and not just at senior level.

My Sgt for my annual appraisal this year is located 25 miles from where I work, and other than 3 emails about sorting my PDR I have never met or spoken to him since he was allocated to me in March this year.

Sent from my PLK-L01 using Tapatalk

Thanks for the future wishes. I am relaxed and have various hobbies and interests to pursue whilst I think about future employment.

I took great pride in my appraisals when a shift and custody Sgt. I made sure I knew who I was appraising, going out and working with them, being honest, even if that did ruffle some feathers. I got so fed up with the appraisal system that I eventually refused to take part in my own and found all I needed to do was put a full stop in each box and the computer would accept it as a response.

The first Inspector who was my line manager when I did that was not best pleased and made enquiries to find out that I could not be forced to take part. So he wrote tons, which I ignored (as the job ignored me) and that was it. Subsequent Inspectors reacted in different ways, a couple thought it was hilarious and my appraisal was a chat over coffee. One was angry, but had to bite her tongue when she also found out she could not make me do it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe part of this is the Butterfly, remote management culture we now have and not just at senior level.

My Sgt for my annual appraisal this year is located 25 miles from where I work, and other than 3 emails about sorting my PDR I have never met or spoken to him since he was allocated to me in March this year.

I know what you mean about remote management TR, there are days when I'm on duty, my nearest manager is 130 miles away! :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard this alot someone feels agrieved at on incident that directly involves them, and they become bitter and decide to hand their bedding in, but not with out shouting from the roof tops to anyone who will listen how badly they have been treated and how terrible the job is. If it was that bad why did you stay?

Organisations change, not always for the better. And in my experience it is usually the "old Guard" that rail against the change. You will hear alot about the "good Old" days and "When I joined up it was so much better" Well that may be true but it is what it is change is inevitable and in my experience pushing back against it rather than embracing it and trying to do the best with what you have is only going to lead to bitterness an resentment. If you're not on board you'll get left behind.

The new blood coming through don't know any different so are free to make the job their own through their own choices. I am sure some will have a negative experience but most will flourish.

(For the record I fully agree that the memo shouldn't have been written or at the very least you should've been given the oppertunity to see it and challenge its content.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe part of this is the Butterfly, remote management culture we now have and not just at senior level.

My Sgt for my annual appraisal this year is located 25 miles from where I work, and other than 3 emails about sorting my PDR I have never met or spoken to him since he was allocated to me in March this year.

I know what you mean about remote management TR, there are days when I'm on duty, my nearest manager is 130 miles away! :blink:

Managers can be remote, even if they are in the same office as you. There were four divisional commanders during my final years. The first one I did not see or meet. The second I only met him when he tried to discipline me and failed, the third completely blanked me and only the fourth knew who i was and actually spoke to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard this alot someone feels agrieved at on incident that directly involves them, and they become bitter and decide to hand their bedding in, but not with out shouting from the roof tops to anyone who will listen how badly they have been treated and how terrible the job is. If it was that bad why did you stay?

Organisations change, not always for the better. And in my experience it is usually the "old Guard" that rail against the change. You will hear alot about the "good Old" days and "When I joined up it was so much better" Well that may be true but it is what it is change is inevitable and in my experience pushing back against it rather than embracing it and trying to do the best with what you have is only going to lead to bitterness an resentment. If you're not on board you'll get left behind.

The new blood coming through don't know any different so are free to make the job their own through their own choices. I am sure some will have a negative experience but most will flourish.

(For the record I fully agree that the memo shouldn't have been written or at the very least you should've been given the oppertunity to see it and challenge its content.)

I feel aggrieved for very good reasons. For me it was not just one incident, it was a whole series of incidents. I am now shouting out with the aim of making a positive change. It was so bad that I left.

The new blood coming through includes a lot of people who should never have been recruited in the first place, but were because of SNP demands to boost the number of Scottish Police Officers. The bad behaviour of young managers is worrying. I was in a muster when a young Inspector stood on a chair and was shouting and swearing at the shift, wanting to take us all on. A cop had questioned a procedural decision she had, quite right too as she had made a mistake. Bullying still goes on, managers with little experience panic and ignore problems, there are lots of issues.

The solution is better management training.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish you luck in your retirement, like you ive been in my job as a nurse for 27 years and thinking of changing to the police. Sometimes change is good, im at the process of sitting one of the exams papers again as i cant get my head round the information handling. Thinks it because im used to a different sytle to what im used to x

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

......

I still have court to attend, but not like many officers, as I am the accused. Apparently going into a cell and stopping someone from killing them self without causing them any injury is an assault. I cannot discuss that further as I head towards year three since it happened. During the first 19 months I was not even sure of what I had done as I was only told there had been an incident and I was placed on restricted duties.

......

I was found not guilty of assault, as the Daily Record reported "A retired Paisley cop has been cleared of assaulting a prisoner after a sheriff said the evidence against him was not “credible”." His ruling also included "I accept there was no intent or mens rea for assault" and he commented on the lack of training and the discrepancy between the alleged excessive force and no injury sustained to the supposed victim. The victim did well in court, he accepted he was strangling himself and despite repeated attempts by the PF, he refused to make a complaint about my actions which prevented him from doing himself any lasting damage.

I have done some research and found a Code of Practice issued by the Lord Advocate in 2011 regarding investigating crime, designed in part to prevent miscarriages of justice, was breached by those who took the initial complaint and conducted the subsequent enquiry.

So CAPs have been initiated against two PCSOs, a Sergeant, two Inspectors and a Chief inspector (their rank at the time, they could have been promoted or retired by now). Police Scotland have accepted I am not making allegations against those people. The evidence is over whelming that they did what I am complaining about. So they will now have to explain their actions.

The aim is to get a fair and proper investigation for all and prevent a rush to convict and get a result on only part of the evidence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now